Find Information About:

Drugs & Supplements

Get information and reviews on prescription drugs, over-the-counter medications, vitamins, and supplements. Search by name or medical condition.

Pill Identifier

Pill Identifier

Having trouble identifying your pills?

Enter the shape, color, or imprint of your prescription or OTC drug. Our pill identification tool will display pictures that you can compare to your pill.

Get Started

My Medicine

Save your medicine, check interactions, sign up for FDA alerts, create family profiles and more.

Get Started

WebMD Health Experts and Community

Talk to health experts and other people like you in WebMD's Communities. It's a safe forum where you can create or participate in support groups and discussions about health topics that interest you.

  • Second Opinion

    Second Opinion

    Read expert perspectives on popular health topics.

  • Community


    Connect with people like you, and get expert guidance on living a healthy life.

Got a health question? Get answers provided by leading organizations, doctors, and experts.

Get Answers

Sign up to receive WebMD's award-winning content delivered to your inbox.

Sign Up

Health & Baby

Font Size

Most U.S. Newborns Get Screening Tests

But Some States Still Lag in Screening Newborns for Birth Defects
WebMD Health News
Reviewed by Louise Chang, MD

July 11, 2007 - The March of Dimes reports that nearly 90% of U.S. newborns now get recommended screening for serious disorders -- up from 38% only two years ago.

In 2004, the American College of Medical Genetics recommended that every newborn baby be screened for 29 genetic or functional disorders such as cystic fibrosis, sickle cell anemia, and hearing loss.

By 2005, only 38% of babies were born in states that required 21 or more of these tests. That percentage has swelled to nearly 90% in 2007.

But a half million U.S. babies still are born in states that required screening for only 10 of the 20 core conditions.

That's too bad -- because if diagnosed early, all of these conditions can be managed or treated to prevent devastating consequences.

Currently, the March of Dimes reports that 13 states and the District of Columbia require screening for all 29 conditions.

But some states that have been lagging are catching up quickly. Montana, Kansas, and West Virginia have enacted legislation -- to be implemented next year -- that will require screening for all core conditions.

Here's the March of Dimes' state-by-state list of the number of the 29 conditions for which each state currently requires screening:

  • Alabama: 21
  • Alaska: 29
  • Arizona: 27
  • Arkansas: 7
  • California: 26
  • Colorado: 29
  • Connecticut 28
  • Delaware: 29
  • District of Columbia: 29
  • Florida: 28
  • Georgia: 28
  • Hawaii: 28
  • Idaho: 28
  • Illinois: 28
  • Indiana: 28
  • Iowa: 29
  • Kansas: 7
  • Kentucky: 29
  • Louisiana: 28
  • Maine: 24
  • Maryland: 29
  • Massachusetts: 12
  • Michigan: 27
  • Minnesota: 29
  • Mississippi: 29
  • Missouri: 28
  • Montana: 6
  • Nebraska: 10
  • Nevada: 27
  • New Hampshire: 12
  • New Jersey: 23
  • New Mexico: 29
  • New York: 29
  • North Carolina: 26
  • North Dakota: 28
  • Ohio: 28
  • Oklahoma: 10
  • Oregon: 23
  • Pennsylvania: 9
  • Rhode Island: 29
  • South Carolina: 28
  • South Dakota: 28
  • Tennessee: 26
  • Texas: 27
  • Utah: 28
  • Vermont: 28
  • Virginia: 29
  • Washington: 12
  • West Virginia: 7
  • Wisconsin: 28
  • Wyoming: 29

Baby's First Year Newsletter

Because every week matters, get expert advice and facts on what to expect in your baby's first year.

Today on WebMD

mother on phone holding baby
When you should call 911.
parents and baby
Unexpected ways your life will change.
baby acne
What’s normal – and what’s not.
baby asleep on moms shoulder
Help your baby get the sleep he needs.

mother holding baby at night
mother with sick child
Chinese mother breast feeding newborn baby girl
Track Your Babys Vaccines
Baby Napping 10 Dos And Donts
Woman holding feet up to camera
Father kissing newborn baby
baby gear slideshow