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Spitting Up, Reflux, GERD

Month 2, Week 2

It's common for babies at this age to spit up shortly after a feeding. Some babies spit up after every meal, while for others it happens only occasionally.

Either way, most babies outgrow it by the time they reach their first birthday. Spit-up that's accompanied by a lot of fussing or spit up in a baby that's not growing well may indicate a more serious medical problem -- discuss it with your pediatrician.

You can reduce spit-up by:

  • Not letting your baby get super hungry before you feed him.
  • Avoiding overfeeding. If he's eating from a bottle, give your baby smaller amounts.
  • Making sure the nipple size is right. Too big and he'll drink too fast; too small, he'll swallow air.
  • Loosening his diapers to avoid putting pressure on his little tummy.
  • Holding your baby upright while he's feeding and burping him each time he takes a break.

Your Baby's Development This Week

Spending his day in a fog of newborn sleepiness is now a thing of the past for your baby. He's become much more social. Expect him to spend most of his day alert, watching and listening to what's going on around him.

People are a source of entertainment now. He likes it when you smile at him, and he likes that he can now smile right back at you.

At this age your baby will:

  • Soon discover that he can have "conversations" with you just by moving his lips
  • Learn that smiling gives him another way besides crying to express his needs
  • Realize that his ability to smile allows him to exert some control over what happens to him

Month 2, Week 2 Tips

  • Keep feeding times calm with few distractions to reduce spit-up.
  • Babies who spit up are not at increased risk for choking while on their backs. So don't put your baby to sleep on his stomach -- it's not safe. Sleeping in any position other than on the back increases the risk of sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS).
  • If you're concerned about spit-up during sleep, you can elevate the head of your baby's crib a few inches with blocks to keep his head higher than his stomach.
  • Following every feeding, hold the baby in an upright position for 20 to 30 minutes.
  • A baby with a full stomach is bound to spit up if he's bounced around. Let some time pass after a feeding before playtime.
  • If your baby's spit-up shows streaks of blood or causes choking or gagging, it's time to see the doctor. Call 911 if the gagging or choking does not stop.
  • If spitting up turns into forceful vomiting, call your pediatrician right away.

WebMD Medical Reference

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