Find Information About:

Drugs & Supplements

Get information and reviews on prescription drugs, over-the-counter medications, vitamins, and supplements. Search by name or medical condition.

Pill Identifier
WebMD

Pill Identifier

Having trouble identifying your pills?

Enter the shape, color, or imprint of your prescription or OTC drug. Our pill identification tool will display pictures that you can compare to your pill.

Get Started
My Medicine
WebMD

My Medicine

Save your medicine, check interactions, sign up for FDA alerts, create family profiles and more.

Get Started

WebMD Health Experts and Community

Talk to health experts and other people like you in WebMD's Communities. It's a safe forum where you can create or participate in support groups and discussions about health topics that interest you.

  • Second Opinion
    WebMD

    Second Opinion

    Read expert perspectives on popular health topics.

  • Community
    WebMD

    Community

    Connect with people like you, and get expert guidance on living a healthy life.

Got a health question? Get answers provided by leading organizations, doctors, and experts.

Get Answers

Sign up to receive WebMD's award-winning content delivered to your inbox.

Sign Up

3. Don’t get angry when your child wets the bed.

Chances are your child is already very upset and ashamed for having wet the bed again last night. And, believe it or not, he didn’t do it on purpose. No matter how tempted you are to get mad, it’s important for you to stay calm and positive. In fact, punishing your child for wetting the bed can actually make the problem worse, and damage your relationship with your child.

One of the best things you can do to help your bedwetting child’s self-esteem is to encourage him and give him hope that he’ll overcome the problem. Similarly, be sure to give your child accolades for waking up dry whenever it happens. If your child has siblings, be sure they know that teasing about bedwetting is not allowed.

4. Make it easy for your child to find the bathroom at nighttime.

Your goal is to have your child get up to use the bathroom in the night if she needs to, so make sure she feels comfortable doing so. It can be helpful to tell her it’s OK to go to the bathroom in the night. For children who are afraid of the dark, placing nightlights in the hallway and the bathroom can make it less scary to venture to the bathroom during the night.

To help your child get used to using the bathroom in the night, it might be helpful for you to wake her up at first to help instill the habit.

5. Encourage your child to take responsibility for wetting the bed.

Just as you don’t want to overemphasize bedwetting, it’s important that you don’t ignore it entirely, either. It can give you child a sense of empowerment and help with the embarrassment if you encourage him to help you clean up and assist with the laundry when bedwetting does occur, if he’s old enough.

It may be helpful to layer the bed with sheets and absorbable pads in between layers. Each morning, or in the middle of the night, the child can remove the wet layer and reveal a dry layer underneath. This may minimize laundry and facilitate the chore of making the bed.