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3. Be Careful With the Baby’s Laundry

When you wash your little one's clothes, use a detergent that's free of perfumes and dyes.

“Many brands carry a ‘free and clear’ product,” Theos says. “Fabric softener, in any form, should be avoided.”

You can use the same product for the entire family.

“A rash could appear anywhere on the body that is covered by clothing, or on the face, due to contact with bedding or parents' clothing,” Theos says.

4. Moisturize

That brand-new, soft baby skin needs to be moisturized, just like yours.

Use a fragrance-free emollient cream or ointment immediately after the bath to keep  dryness at bay, Theos says.

Moisturize more frequently if your little one's skin is dry, during winter months, or if he has eczema.

“Creams and ointments are preferred over lotions, which are more likely to irritate a newborn's skin,” Theos says.

In wintry climates, use heavy moisturizing cream on your baby at least twice a day, Badreshia-Bansal says. “The greasier, the better,” she says.

5. Soothe What’s Sensitive

Diapered skin is often wet, exposed to a lot of friction from rubbing -- and then there’s the poop. All can irritate a baby’s skin.

To take care of this sensitive area, change your baby’s diaper often. Cleanse the area gently with disposable wipes that are alcohol- and fragrance-free, or use a damp washcloth.

Let your baby “air out” when possible, and use a barrier cream before putting on a new diaper.

You can use a barrier ointment such as petroleum jelly after every diaper change. It helps keep your little one's skin from getting too wet and raw.