Skip to content

Health & Parenting

Beach Safety 101

Experts offer advice for a safe day at the beach.
Font Size
A
A
A
By
WebMD Feature
Reviewed by Louise Chang, MD

From death-defying rip currents and red-hot sun to jellyfish stings and shark attacks, the beach can be a pretty scary place. But it doesn't have to be. Experts tell WebMD that a day at the beach can be ... well ... a day at the beach -- when you know what to look out for.

"Swimming and water activities are very healthy so long as you use appropriate caution for yourself and your family when you visit the beach," says B. Chris Brewster, president of the United States Lifesaving Association (USLA), a national organization based in Huntington Beach, Calif. The first step is knowing where danger lurks and how to avoid it.

Conquering Rip Currents

Rip currents, often misnamed rip tides or undertows, occur when surf pushes water up the slope of the beach and then gravity pulls it back. This creates concentrated rivers of water moving offshore. They tend to form as waves disperse along the beach, causing water to become trapped between the beach and a sandbar or another underwater feature. The water converges into a narrow, river-like channel moving away from the shore at high speed. And they are anything but benign. In fact, about 80% of lifeguard rescues at ocean beaches are due to rip currents and 80% of drowning deaths are also due to rip currents, Brewster says. "Rip currents can occur at any surf beach and they tend to be more intense as surf size increases," Brewster says.

The best way to protect yourself from rip currents is to avoid them.

"Select a beach where lifeguards are present because the chances of drowning are 1 in 18 million if a lifeguard is present," he says. Sounds simple enough, but there are many beaches around the U.S. where no lifeguards are provided by the local community, he says. "Make sure beaches are staffed at the time you are swimming," he adds. "At some beaches, lifeguards are only staffed until 6 p.m., for example, so the mere fact that you go to a beach where a lifeguard is present doesn't mean a lifeguard will be present when you are swimming," he says. "Check with them before you swim and ask where the safe places are," he says. "It is their role to help you find the safest place [and] if there are no lifeguards present, you may find a kiosk or signs at beach access points listing such information."

1 | 2 | 3

Today on WebMD

Girl holding up card with BMI written
Is your child at a healthy weight?
toddler climbing
What happens in your child’s second year.
 
father and son with laundry basket
Get your kids to help around the house.
boy frowning at brocolli
Tips for dealing with mealtime mayhem
 
mother and daughter talking
Tool
child brushing his teeth
Slideshow
 
Sipping hot tea
Slideshow
Young woman holding lip at dentists office
Video
 
Which Vaccines Do Adults Need
Article
rl with friends
fitSlideshow
 
tissue box
Quiz
Child with adhd
Slideshow