Skip to content
My WebMD Sign In, Sign Up

Health & Parenting

Font Size

What You Didn't Know About Picky Eaters

Why some children are picky eaters and what to do about it.
By
WebMD Feature

Many preschoolers are picky eaters. They usually outgrow it by age 4 or 5. So, what are the best ways to get them to eat until then?

"Let them choose the clothes they wear, not the foods they eat," says Atlanta-based pediatrician Jennifer Shu, MD, co-author of Food Fights. "Kids get so used to mac and cheese, they forget that asparagus isn't so bad."

It helps to know some of the top reasons why they're so picky.

End the Power Struggle

"Picky habits start when children test their limits, around age 2," Shu says. "Parents don't like rejection. They hear 'no' once or twice, they don't go back to that food."

But many preschoolers need to be offered new foods several times before they taste them. Serving a new food among five or six familiar choices can take the pressure off, says Boston pediatric nutritionist Linda Piette, RD, author of Just Two More Bites!

Trouble Eating

Some kids may still be mastering how to chew and swallow. Some may be inexperienced chewers.

"Many prefer meltable, crunchy carbohydrates because they're easy to eat and have a single texture," says pediatric psychologist Kay Toomey, PhD, of Greenwood Village, Colo.

Show your child what to do. "Banging a carrot on the table and talking about how hard it is teaches that the teeth will need to use pressure to break it apart," Toomey says, "versus yogurt, which is wet and smooth and can be just sucked down."

Not Hungry

Your child might be full from eating too many beverages or snacks.

"Kids carry around portable snack containers and boxes of juice, then they're not hungry for anything later," Shu says. 

Her advice: Serve fewer, healthier snacks. "If the child didn't finish lunch, give those leftover peas or carrots for a snack instead of pretzels or cookies."

An Emotional Reaction

If people are arguing at the table, your child may just want to get out of there. 

"Kids may try to make mealtime shorter," Shu says. "Alternately, they may try to get more attention by not eating, if they think enough attention isn't coming their way."

Today on WebMD

Girl holding up card with BMI written
Is your child at a healthy weight?
toddler climbing
What happens in your child’s second year.
 
father and son with laundry basket
Get your kids to help around the house.
boy frowning at brocolli
Tips for dealing with mealtime mayhem
 
mother and daughter talking
Tool
child brushing his teeth
Slideshow
 
Sipping hot tea
Slideshow
Young woman holding lip at dentists office
Video
 
6-Week Challenges
Want to know more?
Chill Out and Charge Up Challenge – How to help your tribe de-stress and energize.
Spark Change Challenge - Ready for a healthy change? Get some major motivation.
I have read and agreed to WebMD's Privacy Policy.
Enter cell phone number
- -
Entering your cell phone number and pressing submit indicates you agree to receive text messages from WebMD related to this challenge. WebMD is utilizing a 3rd party vendor, CellTrust, to provide the messages. You can opt out at any time.
Standard text rates apply
Which Vaccines Do Adults Need
Article
rl with friends
fitSlideshow
 
tissue box
Quiz
Child with adhd
Slideshow