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    Growing Pains: When Should Parents Worry?

    Morning pain may mean something more serious is wrong with your child.
    By
    WebMD Feature

    Like mumps and measles, growing pains are a rite of passage, a sign of growing up. Most parents take it in stride. "It's just growing pains," they tell their crying child.

    But what exactly are these pains? Why do some kids get severe pain, while others get none? Could the pain mean something is really wrong? How can parents know?

    Growing pains typically occur between ages 3 and 7. Doctors say the pain is triggered when bones grow, stretching the bone's thick covering, explains Larry Vogler, MD, a pediatric rheumatologist at Emory University School of Medicine in Atlanta.

    According to the American Academy of Pediatrics, these pains have been linked to particularly active days and not growth. Growing pains are real discomforts for many children; often growing pains can awaken children from sleep.

    Some kids are predisposed to getting growing pains. If dad had them, his child will, too. The pains seem most intense after a day of vigorous jumping and running. Kids typically feel the pains at night, then they disappear in the morning. "Be reassuring, give a massage, and give Tylenol with a little food if you think you need to," Vogler tells WebMD.

    If your child develops certain symptoms, it's wise to notify your child's doctor. Worrisome symptoms that might indicate that something other than growing pains and something more serious may be going on include:

    • Persistent pain, pain in the morning or swelling, tenderness, and redness in a joint
    • Joint pain associated with an injury
    • Limping, weakness, or unusual tiredness

    If a child wakes up in the morning with leg pains -- then feels relief after moving around -- it may be juvenile rheumatoid arthritis (JRA), says Thomas J. A. Lehman, MD, chief of pediatric rheumatology for the Hospital for Special Surgery at Weill Medical College of Cornell University. Lehman is the author of It's Not Just Growing Pains.

    "Those pains need to be investigated by a doctor," Lehman tells WebMD. "They should not be simply dismissed. It may not be anything serious, but it needs to be evaluated."

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