Skip to content
My WebMD Sign In, Sign Up

Health & Parenting

Font Size

10 Secrets of Great Moms


WebMD Feature from "Redbook" Magazine

By Lindsey Palmer
Redbook Magazine Logo
REDBOOK knows that moms know. So the life-tested parenting advice here comes straight from the mouths of the experts — you!

1. Gather Helping Hands

“Enlist everyone you can to help you. Just because you’re a mother, that doesn’t mean you have to be Wonder Woman. When my daughter was born, I called my sister crying. Hearing how overwhelmed I was, she came in all the way from Alaska and helped me set up a schedule, which was such a lifesaver! It takes a village to raise a child, especially a newborn, and you’re a better mother for asking for the assistance that you need.”
—Trisha Idoni, 43, mother to Mallory, 8; Pensacola, FL

2. Help Homework Happen

As soon as my kids get home from school, I set them up for homework time, with each child at his or her own station in the kitchen so that they don’t mix up their papers. Then I find something to do in the vicinity so that I’m nearby for help if they need it, but not hovering over them. It’s a routine we stick to, so the kids know what’s expected of them every day.”
—Karen Schiff Freeman, 37, mother to Rebecca, 12, Jarrett, 9, and Lexi, 6; Solon, OH

3. Put Nightmares to Bed

“When your child has nightmares, here’s how to ward off ‘monsters’: Use a battery-operated handheld fan to chase them away, and fill a spray bottle with ‘Go-Away Monster Spray.’ Then lie in bed with your child and ask him what he’d like to dream about, suggesting pleasant things like sharing an ice cream cone or building a sand castle on the beach. This worked with my son, and now he sleeps through the night.”
—Lisa Keddy, 43, mother to Nicholas, 6; Ocean, NJ

4. Win the Sweets War

“I serve my kids whatever I plan to feed them for dinner, including a small portion of dessert, all together on those plastic sectioned character plates (Dora the Explorer and SpongeBob are their favorites). Each area has chicken, rice, salad, and a Popsicle, or something similar. I don’t bug them to eat the veggies before the treat, so even if they have dessert first, it’s small enough that they don’t fill up — therefore they always move on to eat a nice amount of dinner. It works like a charm.”
—Emily Becker, 39, mother to Jonathan, 11, and Madelyn, 4; Belmont, CA

5. Get Feelings Out There, Good and Bad

“When I had a cranky child on my hands, I’d swoop her into my lap and say, “It’s time to complain, so let’s complain together. Oh, I feel so angry, or hurt, or sad,’ hugging her the whole time and letting her be cranky. After a while, she felt soothed and ready to move on. Also, she learned to put words to her feelings.”
—Nancy Feingold, 57, mother to Seth, 26, Lindsey, 24, and Adam, 22; Newton, MA

Today on WebMD

Girl holding up card with BMI written
Is your child at a healthy weight?
toddler climbing
What happens in your child’s second year.
 
father and son with laundry basket
Get your kids to help around the house.
boy frowning at brocolli
Tips for dealing with mealtime mayhem
 
mother and daughter talking
Tool
child brushing his teeth
Slideshow
 
Sipping hot tea
Slideshow
Young woman holding lip at dentists office
Video
 
6-Week Challenges
Want to know more?
Chill Out and Charge Up Challenge – How to help your tribe de-stress and energize.
Spark Change Challenge - Ready for a healthy change? Get some major motivation.
I have read and agreed to WebMD's Privacy Policy.
Enter cell phone number
- -
Entering your cell phone number and pressing submit indicates you agree to receive text messages from WebMD related to this challenge. WebMD is utilizing a 3rd party vendor, CellTrust, to provide the messages. You can opt out at any time.
Standard text rates apply
Which Vaccines Do Adults Need
Article
rl with friends
fitSlideshow
 
tissue box
Quiz
Child with adhd
Slideshow