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How to Handle a Temper Tantrum

(continued)

How to Stop the Screaming continued...

If your child still won't calm down and you know the tantrum is just a ploy to get your attention, don't give in. Even if you have to walk through the supermarket dragging your screaming toddler, just ignore the tantrum. Once your child realizes the temper tantrum isn't getting her anywhere, she'll stop screaming.

If your child is upset to the point of being inconsolable or out of control, hold him tightly to calm him down. Tell him gently that you love him but that you're not going to give him what he wants. If that doesn't work, remove him from the situation and put him in a time-out for a minute or two to give him time to calm down. The general guideline for the length of a time-out is one minute per year of the child's age.

Tantrum Prevention Tactics

Instead of having to stop a temper tantrum after it starts, prevent it by following these tips:

  • Avoid situations in which tantrums are likely to erupt. Try to keep your daily routines as consistent as possible and give your child a five-minute warning before changing activities.
  • Communicate with your toddler. Don't underestimate his ability to understand what you are saying. Tell him the plan for the day and stick to your routine to minimize surprises.
  • Allow your child to take a toy or food item with her while you run errands. It may help her stay occupied.
  • Make sure your child is well rested and fed before you go out so he doesn't blow up at the slightest provocation. 
  • Put away off-limit temptations (for example, don't leave candy bars lying on the kitchen counter close to dinnertime) so they don't lead to battles.
  • Give your toddler a little bit of control. Let your child choose which book to bring in the car or whether she wants grilled cheese or PB&J for lunch. These little choices won't make much of a difference to you, but they'll make your child feel as though she has at least some control over her own life.
  • Pick your battles. Sometimes you can give in a little, especially when it comes to small things. Would you rather let your child watch15 extra minutes of television or listen to her scream for 30 minutes?
  • Distract. A young child's attention is fleeting and easy to divert. When your child's face starts to crinkle and redden in that telltale way, open a book or offer to go on a walk to the park before it can escalate into a full-blown tantrum. Sometimes, humor is the best way to distract. Make a funny face, tell a joke, or start a pillow fight to get your child's mind off what's upsetting him.
  • Teach your child other ways of dealing with frustration. Children who are old enough to talk can be reminded to use their words instead of screaming.

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