Skip to content

Health & Parenting

Bullying May Be Linked to Violence at Home

Study Shows Bullies and Victims of Bullying Are More Likely to Be Exposed to Violence at Home
Font Size
A
A
A

Red Flags for Bullying

Parents who are concerned that their child is a bully, being bullied, or both needs to get involved, Hertz says. “Talk to their school if there are changes in behavior or academic achievement or if a previously outgoing child has become withdrawn and is not wanting to go places.”

Bullying can also take place via text messaging, Facebook, and on other web sites. “Ask where your kids go online the same way that you ask where they are going when they leave the house,” she says.

Massachusetts Public Health Commissioner John Auerbach agrees. “Bullying is a prevalent problem in schools and in the lives of young people and it can have dire consequences,” he says via email. “For these reasons, it is important to prevent bullying before it starts, rather than merely developing responses when it occurs."

Going forward, he says, “Changing social climate in schools and supporting young people in developing healthy relationships with adults and peers are the best ways to prevent bullying.”

Auerbach says that youth who have more social support from adults and peers are less likely to experience severe negative consequences from bullying. “So, when bullying does occur, it is very important that parents take it seriously and take a role in working with the child’s school to find a solution,” he says. “Parents can talk with their children about the bullying, express empathy, and never suggest that the bullying is the victim’s fault.”

“Bullying now follows kids to their home, and we are starting to hear more stories about kids hurting themselves or others to get out of the bullying,” says Jennifer Newman, PhD, a staff psychologist in the division of trauma psychiatry at North Shore-LIJ Health System in Manhasset, N.Y. Newman’s hospital offers free counseling to children who are affected by bullying.

Prevention of bullying starts at home. “Parents have to be really aware of what is going on with children and talk openly about bullying and be in contact with their school and teachers and work together as a team,” she says.  “Schools are rolling out programs to stop bullying, but they are finding that these programs may not be as effective if they don’t include families.”

Today on WebMD

Girl holding up card with BMI written
Is your child at a healthy weight?
toddler climbing
What happens in your child’s second year.
 
father and son with laundry basket
Get your kids to help around the house.
boy frowning at brocolli
Tips for dealing with mealtime mayhem
 
mother and daughter talking
Tool
child brushing his teeth
Slideshow
 
Sipping hot tea
Slideshow
Young woman holding lip at dentists office
Video
 
Which Vaccines Do Adults Need
Article
rl with friends
fitSlideshow
 
tissue box
Quiz
Child with adhd
Slideshow