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Study: HPV Vaccine Doesn't Encourage Risky Sexual Activity

CDC Survey Shows No Evidence That Vaccine Encourages Risk Taking Among Adolescents and Young Women
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WebMD Health News
Reviewed by Laura J. Martin, MD

Dec. 13, 2011 -- Girls and young women who are vaccinated against human papillomavirus (HPV) appear to be no more likely than those who are not vaccinated to engage in sexually risky behaviors, a CDC survey finds.

HPV is the most common sexually transmitted infection in the U.S., with an estimated 6.2 million new infections each year.

Two types of the virus, HPV 16 and HPV 18, are responsible for 70% of cervical cancers. HPV also causes genital warts and can lead to cancer of the cervix, vagina, vulva, penis, and anus.

With the approval of the first vaccine to prevent HPV infection in 2006 and the second in 2009, concerns emerged that vaccination might promote sexually risky behaviors.

Results from the CDC survey suggest these concerns may be unfounded, but researcher Nicole C. Liddon, PhD, warns against over-interpreting the findings.

Liddon is a research scientist with the CDC’s Division of Adolescent and School Health.

“This survey represents a snapshot in time, and we cannot rule out the possibility that the HPV vaccine leads to sexual risk taking,” she tells WebMD. “But this should help calm concerns of parents and (health care) providers to some degree.”

HPV Common in the Sexually Active

Among non-vaccinated girls and boys, infection with HPV is very common following initiation of sexual behavior.

By one estimate, 24% of teenaged girls in the U.S. between the ages of 14 and 19 and 45% of women in their early to mid-20s are infected with HPV.

For this reason, vaccination efforts target girls who are not yet sexually active. Current recommendations call for vaccination of girls and women ages 11-26 with the Cervarix or Gardasil vaccine. The Gardasil vaccine is also approved for use in boys.

In an effort to examine vaccine coverage rates and whether being vaccinated against HPV has any impact on behavior, Liddon and colleagues examined survey data from more than 1,200 young women between the ages of 15 and 24.

The women were participants in a CDC-sponsored survey examining sexual and reproductive health issues among teens and young adults.

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