Skip to content
My WebMD Sign In, Sign Up

Health & Parenting

Font Size
A
A
A

Bottles, Binkies, and Batteries Send Kids to ER

Injuries Caused by Batteries, Baby Bottles, Sippy Cups, and Pacifiers on the Rise
By
WebMD Health News

May 14, 2012 -- The same bottle or toy that comforts small children may prove dangerous as they get older and more curious.

New research shows that every four hours a child under 3 is treated in an emergency room for an injury caused by a baby bottle, pacifier, or sippy cup. Most of the injuries were cuts and bruises caused by falls while walking or running with the item in the mouth.

Another new study shows that more than 66,000 children have been treated in the ER since 1990 for battery-related injuries, like swallowing a small, coin-sized button battery from a toy or remote control.

Researchers say the number of these injuries in young children is on the rise, along with the increasing popularity of lithium button batteries in electronic devices.

Swallowing a button battery, such as those found in remote controls, electronic games, and watches, can be especially dangerous for young children. Researchers say these small batteries can become lodged in the esophagus and can lead to severe injury or even death in less than two hours.

Both studies will appear in the June issue of Pediatrics.

Comfort Items Can Be Dangerous

The first study looked at injuries caused by bottles, pacifiers, and sippy cups requiring treatment in an emergency room in children under age 3.

Using information from the National Electric Injury Surveillance System, researchers found an estimated 45,000 children were treated in ERs for these injuries from 1991 to 2010.

Most injuries involved bottles (65.8%), followed by pacifiers (19.9%) and sippy cups (14.3%). More than 86% of the injuries were caused by falls while using the products.

"We found that approximately two-thirds of injuries occurred at age 1 year, when children have transitioned to unsteady walking and are prone to falls," write researcher Sarah Keim, PhD, of the Research Institute at Nationwide Children's Hospital in Columbus, Ohio, and colleagues.

Although the injuries were serious enough to merit a trip to the ER, researchers say that very few were fatal. Cuts and bruises accounted for about 83% of injuries.

Researchers say it's the first study to look specifically at injuries in young children caused by bottles, pacifiers, and sippy cups.

Overall, the number of injuries caused by these products was small compared with the injuries caused by other baby products like cribs, bassinets, and playpens. But researchers say they represent an important and growing source of injuries over the last 20 years.

Given the risks associated with baby bottles, pacifiers, and sippy cups among young children, researchers recommend children not use these products beyond the intended ages. For example, the American Academy of Pediatrics recommends children transition from a sippy cup to a regular cup around age 1.

Today on WebMD

family walking on the beach
Slideshow
two boys in a swing
Article
 
mistakes_parents_make_with_toddlers_2.jpg
Article
woman with cleaning products
Slideshow
 
mother and daughter talking
Tool
child brushing his teeth
Slideshow
 
Sipping hot tea
Slideshow
Young woman holding lip at dentists office
Video
 
6-Week Challenges
Want to know more?
Build a Fitter Family Challenge – Get your crew motivated to move.
Feed Your Family Better Challenge - Tips and tricks to healthy up your diet.
Sleep Better Challenge - Snooze clues for the whole family.
I have read and agreed to WebMD's Privacy Policy.
Enter cell phone number
- -
Entering your cell phone number and pressing submit indicates you agree to receive text messages from WebMD related to this challenge. WebMD is utilizing a 3rd party vendor, CellTrust, to provide the messages. You can opt out at any time.
Standard text rates apply
Which Vaccines Do Adults Need
Article
rl with friends
fitSlideshow
 
tissue box
Quiz
Child with adhd
Slideshow