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Health & Parenting

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Could a Little Video Game Play Be Good for Kids?

Study found children who played an hour or less a day were the most well-adjusted


The opposite held for kids who played more than three hours, a finding that has been reflected in earlier research on video games.

There's one likely reason for the positive impact that came from a minimum amount of gaming, Przybylski said -- the kids are having fun.

"When kids are having fun and are at play, you'd expect them to be happy, right?" he said.

Other experts agreed. "Video games are good at challenging players to solve problems, and overcoming those problems can be very gratifying," said Dr. Paul Weigle, a pediatric and adolescent psychiatrist in Mansfield Center, Conn. "They can have a benefit for teaching problem-solving and persistence."

A kid who plays some video games also might find it easier to socially connect with classmates than those who don't, Weigle added.

"Friendships are often based on mutual interests," he said. "For better or worse, most kids are spending a substantial amount of time playing video games. Kids who aren't playing video games can feel left out of the conversation."

Weigle noted there could be other explanations outside video games for the results found in the study.

For example, a kid who plays video games less than an hour a day may benefit from caring parents who are more engaged and limiting their child's time in front of the computer or television. By the same token, a teen who never plays video games may live in a financially strapped, stress-filled home.

The findings do lend support to the American Academy of Pediatrics' recommendation that parents limit children's video game or screen time to an hour or less a day, Weigle said.

"Unfortunately, that's very different from the average media intake of American kids, which has been an average of seven hours of electronic media every day, and two hours of that video game play," he said.

Noting the small impact that video games exhibited on emotional growth, Przybylski said concerned parents who want to help their child's development would do best to spend more time with them -- even if that means grabbing a controller and sitting down next to them.

"Active engagement -- maybe even playing video games with your child -- will give you a better understanding and provide you valuable insights into why your child is playing and what they're getting out of that," he said.

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