0 0
  • Question 1/10

    How much exercise do kids need every day?

  • Answer 1/10

    How much exercise do kids need every day?

    • You answered:
    • Correct Answer:

    Kids ages 6 to 17 need to get at least 1 hour of exercise every day. It helps them sleep better, burn off energy, and even build stronger thinking skills. Their exercise should be enough to get them breathing faster and their heart rate up. Depending on your child, that could mean a brisk walk to a really good run.

    Any movement counts, and small bursts can add up to the 60 minutes: walking to school, playing tag, or turning on music and dancing in the living room. They're all good ways to get your kids to move.

  • Question 1/10

    How many high school kids actually get 60 minutes of exercise a day?

  • Answer 1/10

    How many high school kids actually get 60 minutes of exercise a day?

    • You answered:
    • Correct Answer:

    Surprised? Actually, the number is as low as 29%. Girls fare worse. Just 19% of them get enough.

    If 60 minutes seems like too much to fit into a busy day, think about it this way: They don't have to do it all at once. Moving for 10 minutes at a time throughout the day can help. The average kid spends about 9 hours a day watching movies and TV, playing video games, and using electronic gadgets. Cut back on some screen time -- kids should be getting less than 2 hours a day -- and get them moving more. They can walk the dog before school, take a bike ride or shoot hoops when they get home, or join you for a family walk after dinner. It all adds up.

  • Question 1/10

    Why does exercise make kids feel good over the long run?

  • Answer 1/10

    Why does exercise make kids feel good over the long run?

    • You answered:
    • Correct Answer:

    Regular exercise boosts blood flow to the brain, making cells healthier -- especially in the areas connected with mood. That's why physical activity gives most people a lift.

    Endorphins, your brain's feel-good chemicals, do cause a natural high. But it doesn't last long. And you have to really exercise hard to feel the effect.

  • Question 1/10

    A few minutes of exercise can increase:

  • Answer 1/10

    A few minutes of exercise can increase:

    • You answered:
    • Correct Answer:

    When kids take a few minutes to move around, it can actually give them more get-up-and-go, even if they're feeling sluggish. Exercise triggers the body to release chemicals that it uses as energy. Just a few minutes of movement can kick your kid's body into gear, recharging and re-energizing him.

    Exercise helps kids become better learners, too. Studies have found that after a quick burst of activity, kids with attention problems scored better on math and reading tests.

    Try to get your kids to be active before they settle down to do homework -- play basketball, ride bikes, or do some jumping jacks. It will help them focus and get to their daily exercise goal of 60 minutes.

  • Question 1/10

    The more your kids exercise, the better they'll sleep.

  • Answer 1/10

    The more your kids exercise, the better they'll sleep.

    • You answered:
    • Correct Answer:

    It's true -- moving more means they'll fall asleep faster and stay asleep longer.

    Heard the advice that they shouldn't be active too close to bedtime? The opinion on that is changing. Some experts now say that if the only time you can fit in physical activity for your kids is within a few hours of bed, give it a shot and see how they do. The benefits of exercise are too good to pass up.

  • Question 1/10

    Which one helps strengthen kids' bones?

  • Answer 1/10

    Which one helps strengthen kids' bones?

    • You answered:
    • Correct Answer:

    Swimming and biking are great types of exercise. But to build strong bones, your kid needs weight-bearing exercises -- the kind that makes them support their own body weight. Those are activities like skateboarding, running, and even hopscotch.

  • Question 1/10

    If kids are counting steps with a  pedometer, they should get:

  • Answer 1/10

    If kids are counting steps with a  pedometer, they should get:

    • You answered:
    • Correct Answer:

    Getting your kids to use one of these step counters is a great way to get them moving. Adults should aim for 10,000 steps a day. Girls need 11,000, and boys need 13,000.

    That might seem like a lot. But remember that kids tend to move around more than adults do. A kid's stride is also a lot shorter than a grown-up's, so they take more steps to cover the same distance.

  • Question 1/10

    Parents take their boys outside to play more than girls.

  • Answer 1/10

    Parents take their boys outside to play more than girls.

    • You answered:
    • Correct Answer:

    Studies show that parents are 16% less likely to take their preschool girls outside to play than their boys. A lot of parents think of energetic, outside time as a "boy thing." But not even boys get enough of it. Only half of all preschool kids play outside with their parents once a day.

    Free play outside is a key way to get all kids to love being active. To inspire the fun, have a bucket of toys -- jump ropes, balls, and sidewalk chalk -- ready to grab and go.

  • Question 1/10

    When it comes to fitness, the most important role model for your kid is:

  • Answer 1/10

    When it comes to fitness, the most important role model for your kid is:

    • You answered:
    • Correct Answer:

    Remember that you have a huge effect on how much your kids exercise. Studies show that how much a parent moves is key in whether a kid exercises or not.

    It's not just how much you exercise that matters; it's whether you enjoy it. So find something you like to do and go for it. You can show your kids that exercise isn't a chore -- it's fun!

  • Question 1/10

    Compared with traditional video games, how many calories can an active video game burn?

  • Answer 1/10

    Compared with traditional video games, how many calories can an active video game burn?

    • You answered:
    • Correct Answer:

    You don't want your kids to get alltheir activity in front of a screen. But active video games -- with motion-sensitive controllers or cameras -- are fine for getting some of that daily 60 minutes of movement. If they get up and really get into them, it's definitely a whole lot healthier than sitting down, clutching a controller, and punching buttons.

  • Your Score:

    0
    Your Score:

    You correctly answered out of questions.

    Results:

    Great job! You're an expert in kids' fitness. How will you and your kids get moving next?

    Results:

    Good work. You know a lot about kids and fitness. Now, grab your kids and get moving.

    Results:

    Well, looks like you learned some new facts about kids' fitness. Try and pick one new way to move with your kids and give it a shot today.

    Share your score
    Next
    Next Quiz:

    Rheumatoid Arthritis Myths and Facts

    Retake Quiz

Sources | Reviewed by Roy Benaroch, MD on August 18, 2015 Medically Reviewed on August 18, 2015

Reviewed by Roy Benaroch, MD on
August 18, 2015

IMAGE PROVIDED BY:

1)    Jupiterimages / Getty

SOURCES:

Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center: "Walking Can Improve Mood."

The Brookings Institution: "Exercise Increases Productivity."

CDC: "How Much Physical Activity Do Children Need?" "Physical Activity Facts."

Family Doctor: "Health Is a State of Mind and Body."

Kids Health: "5 Reasons Girls Should Play Sports."

Let's Move: "Get Active."

National Sleep Foundation: "Myths and Facts."

National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases: "Kids and Their Bones."

Nixon, G. Archives of Disease in Children, 2009.

Pontifex, M. The Journal of Pediatrics, March 2013.

President's Council on Physical Fitness and Sports: "The Role of Family in Promoting Physical Activity."

Smallwood, S. Archives of Pediatrics and Adolescent Medicine, November 2012.

Tandon, P. Archives of Pediatric and Adolescent Medicine, August 2012.

University of Maryland Medical Center: News Release, March 1, 2007.

Women's Sports Foundation: "Why Sports Participation for Girls and Women."

This tool does not provide medical advice.
See additional information.

THIS TOOL DOES NOT PROVIDE MEDICAL ADVICE. It is intended for general informational purposes only and does not address individual circumstances. It is not a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment and should not be relied on to make decisions about your health. Never ignore professional medical advice in seeking treatment because of something you have read on the WebMD Site. If you think you may have a medical emergency, immediately call your doctor or dial 911.