Find Information About:

Drugs & Supplements

Get information and reviews on prescription drugs, over-the-counter medications, vitamins, and supplements. Search by name or medical condition.

Pill Identifier

Pill Identifier

Having trouble identifying your pills?

Enter the shape, color, or imprint of your prescription or OTC drug. Our pill identification tool will display pictures that you can compare to your pill.

Get Started

My Medicine

Save your medicine, check interactions, sign up for FDA alerts, create family profiles and more.

Get Started

WebMD Health Experts and Community

Talk to health experts and other people like you in WebMD's Communities. It's a safe forum where you can create or participate in support groups and discussions about health topics that interest you.

  • Second Opinion

    Second Opinion

    Read expert perspectives on popular health topics.

  • Community


    Connect with people like you, and get expert guidance on living a healthy life.

Got a health question? Get answers provided by leading organizations, doctors, and experts.

Get Answers

Sign up to receive WebMD's award-winning content delivered to your inbox.

Sign Up

Raising Fit Kids: Healthy Nurtition, Exercise, and Weight

  This content is selected and controlled by WebMD's editorial staff in collaboration with Sanford Health Systems.

Healthy Habit 2: Don't let your child set the menu. continued...

When you're making a healthy entrée that your child might not like, experts recommend that you include a healthy food that she does like -- fruit, for instance -- as a side dish. That way, there's something familiar for her.

If she protests, experts suggest that you be firm: Make it clear that her choices are limited to what you've served. Resist the temptation to cave in and make her a separate meal. In time, she'll come to accept the limits that you're setting -- and will start trying some healthier foods.

Allow your child to help prepare the meal, which may encourage her to try the new fruits or veggies being introduced.

Healthy Habit 3: Choose to reduce TV time.

Because many studies have found a clear association between television-watching and obesity, experts say that reducing your kids' TV time makes sense. The American Academy of Pediatrics recommends no more than two hours of TV-watching a day for kids aged 2 and older. It's best if children younger than 2 not watch TV at all.

Of course, the most effective way to curb a child's TV watching is for you to also limit your time in front of the box. The easiest way to successfully have a healthy family is for you to lead by example.

Afraid such healthy goals will challenge your poise and patience? If you're swooping in every 15 minutes, scowling, and clicking off the TV, yes -- you might face a revolt. Or your kids will just scurry off to a different screen -- a computer, a video game, or a TV in another room.

To keep your cool (and achieve your goal of having a healthy family), don't focus on what your kids can't do but rather on what they can do. For instance, don't even mention after-school TV. Instead, create a list of activities -- rain or shine -- that they can do after school, like dancing to favorite songs, playing on the backyard playset, biking in the neighborhood, or helping to prepare dinner. Then, let your child pick something from that list.


For Kids and Parents. Kid Tested. Expert Approved.

Kids Healthy Weight & BMI Calculator

Enter your child's information:
Get Started