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  • Question 1/8

    Your baby can get eczema at day care.

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    Answer 1/8

    Your baby can get eczema at day care.

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    Eczema is a common skin problem that can make your baby's skin red, itchy, and sore. But your little bundle of joy didn't catch this rash from anybody, and she can't give it to anyone else. Babies and children with eczema often have relatives with it. Or they have family members with asthma, hay fever, or other allergies. Scientists think it could be passed down from parents' genes, but no one is sure why some children get it.

     

  • Question 1/8

    Babies who have eczema have it for life.

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    Babies who have eczema have it for life.

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    There's no cure for eczema, but that doesn't mean your baby will have sore and itchy skin forever. It tends to get better with time. Eczema goes away in some children by the time they turn 2. About half of children who get eczema outgrow it. And for those who do have eczema as adults, it is usually milder than when they were children.

     

  • Question 1/8

    What you eat while breastfeeding can affect eczema. 

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    Answer 1/8

    What you eat while breastfeeding can affect eczema. 

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    Eczema got better in breastfed babies when their mothers stopped drinking milk and eating eggs, some studies have shown. Also, babies who were breastfed for at least 4 months were less likely to get eczema, especially if their moms didn't drink milk, other studies have shown.

     

    But if you're concerned that what you or your baby is eating may be adding to their eczema, talk with your doctor and your baby’s pediatrician. Although you may want to switch things up, most eczema in babies isn’t related to breast milk or formula.

     

  • Question 1/8

    Not bathing your baby as much will help their skin.

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    Not bathing your baby as much will help their skin.

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    Short daily baths with lukewarm water and mild cleanser can help keep away infection and be soothing to your baby. Don't use much soap, though. And avoid bubble baths and harsh or scented soaps that will irritate her skin. After bathing your baby, rinse her off twice to remove all soap. Then apply cream or ointment within 3 minutes to lock in moisture.

     

  • Question 1/8

    Drooling can make your baby's eczema worse.

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    Answer 1/8

    Drooling can make your baby's eczema worse.

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    It's not unusual for babies to get rashes on their chins and cheeks from drooling. But if your baby has eczema, that saliva can really irritate her sensitive skin. What can you do? Put an ointment like petroleum jelly on her chin, cheeks, and neck to create a barrier between the drool and her skin.

     

     

  • Question 1/8

    Cotton clothing is best for babies with eczema. 

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    Answer 1/8

    Cotton clothing is best for babies with eczema. 

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    Loose clothing made from cotton and other natural materials will feel better on your baby's skin. Don't dress her in wool or anything scratchy. Wash her clothes before she wears them, and use mild detergents and soaps that don't have perfumes, dyes, or alcohol. Look for things that are labeled "fragrance-free," "hypoallergenic," and "for sensitive skin." Avoid "unscented," because those products can still irritate skin.

     

  • Question 1/8

    Your baby's eczema is likely to be worse in the winter.

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    Answer 1/8

    Your baby's eczema is likely to be worse in the winter.

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    Think about how chapped your lips can become in the winter when the air is dry. That dry air also affects your baby's eczema. Using a humidifier won't help much, though. The best thing to do is keep her skin moist by applying a thick cream or ointment. Your baby's skin should get better in the summer when there's naturally more moisture in the air.

     

  • Question 1/8

    Babies with eczema are likely to have other allergies.

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    Answer 1/8

    Babies with eczema are likely to have other allergies.

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    Babies and children with eczema may be more likely to have allergies or asthma, but eczema doesn't cause them. Half of children with eczema have asthma, and two-thirds of kids with eczema get hay fever.

     

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Sources | Reviewed by Dan Brennan, MD on December 19, 2015 Medically Reviewed on December 19, 2015

Reviewed by Dan Brennan, MD on
December 19, 2015

IMAGE PROVIDED BY:

Getty / FUSE

SOURCES:

American Academy of Dermatology: "Atopic Dermatitis: Diagnosis, Treatment, and Outcome," "Different Kinds of Eczema," "Itchy Skin," "Stop Itchy Skin Before It Starts."

American Academy of Pediatrics: "Eczema."

Cant, A. British Medical Journal, 1986.

Children's Health Network: "Newborn Skin Rashes and Birthmarks."

Cleveland Clinic: "Understanding Eczema."

Kids Health: "Eczema," "Eek, It's Eczema."

National Eczema Association:  "All About Atopic Dermatitis," "Infant and Toddler Eczema."

University of Maryland Medical Center: "Eczema."

This tool does not provide medical advice.
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