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Health & Parenting

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Helping Your Teen Become a Safe Driver - Topic Overview

Most parents are nervous about their teenager driving a car. As a parent, you are right in your concern. While teenagers only account for 6% of all drivers (6 out of 100), young drivers ages 15 to 20 are involved in 13% of fatal crashes (13 out of 100).1

Most teens learn to drive by taking driver's education classes. While teens are learning to drive, they need to get as much experience as possible with another adult in the car. Not all parents have the temperament to do this, though. If you find yourself screaming at your teen or making sarcastic remarks, ask another adult family member or friend to help out.

Don't let your teen drive alone-even after he or she gets a license-until your teen has had enough experience and until you as a parent feel comfortable with your teen's driving skills. Also, make sure your teen has enough supervised experience driving in adverse conditions, such as rain or snow or at night, before you allow him or her to drive in these conditions unsupervised.

Some things about driving that parents need to emphasize:

  • Don't eat, use a cell phone, or take your eyes off the road for even a moment while you are driving. Even using the radio can distract drivers and cause accidents. Headphones should never be worn by drivers.
  • Drive defensively. Look out for other drivers.
  • Make sure your car (tires, brakes, etc.) is in safe condition.
  • Driving while under the influence of alcohol or drugs is both dangerous and illegal. Riding in a car with a driver under the influence is life-threatening.
  • Don't drive when you are tired.
  • Seat belts must always be worn by the driver and passengers.

Remember to always set a good example for your child.

    WebMD Medical Reference from Healthwise

    Last Updated: September 09, 2014
    This information is not intended to replace the advice of a doctor. Healthwise disclaims any liability for the decisions you make based on this information.
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