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Teen Substance Use: Making a Contract With Your Teen - Topic Overview

Putting a plan for avoiding alcohol and substance use in writing will help your teen make good decisions in the future. Using the example below, have your teen help you write the contract. Teens feel more responsible for their actions when they are part of the rule-making process. The symbolism of signing a contract gives both parties a heightened sense of commitment to the process.

We know that alcohol, cigarette, inhalant, and drug use can affect a young person's physical growth, emotional development, school performance, and health. We agree that I, __________________________________, will not drink alcohol or use any other harmful or illegal substances. Our plan for preventing substance use problems includes what to do in risky situations and what the consequences are for substance use.

Risky situations

In risky situations, we agree to the following:

  • If offered a substance (alcohol, cigarettes, inhalant, or drugs), I will:

  • If I am at an event where alcohol or drugs are being used, I will:

  • If offered a ride from someone who has been using drugs or drinking, I will:

  • Other risky situations that we have identified include:

Consequences

We agree to the following:

  • If I smoke, the consequence will be:

  • If I use an inhalant, the consequence will be:

  • If I drink alcohol, the consequence will be:

  • If I take other drugs, the consequence will be:

  • If I ride with a driver who is or has been drinking or using drugs, the consequence will be:

  • If I drive after or while drinking alcohol or using other drugs, the consequence will be:

  • If I continue to drink alcohol or use other substances, the consequence will be:

  • If I develop signs of a substance use problem, the consequence will be:

    This information is produced and provided by the National Cancer Institute (NCI). The information in this topic may have changed since it was written. For the most current information, contact the National Cancer Institute via the Internet web site at http:// cancer .gov or call 1-800-4-CANCER.

    WebMD Medical Reference from Healthwise

    Last Updated: 2/, 014
    This information is not intended to replace the advice of a doctor. Healthwise disclaims any liability for the decisions you make based on this information.
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