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    Medical Reference Related to Prostate Cancer

    1. Prostate Cancer, Nutrition, and Dietary Supplements (PDQ®): Complementary and alternative medicine - Health Professional Information [NCI] - Green Tea

      OverviewThis section contains the following key information:All tea originates from the Camellia sinensis (L.) Kuntze plant, and the methods by which the leaves are processed determine the type of tea produced. For green tea, the leaves are steamed and dried.Some research suggests that green tea may have a protective effect against cardiovascular disease and against various forms of cancer, including prostate cancer.Catechins are polyphenol compounds in tea that are associated with many of tea's proposed health benefits.Epigallocatechin gallate (EGCG), the most abundant catechin in tea, acts as an androgen antagonist and can suppress prostate cancer cell proliferation, suppress production of prostate-specific antigen (PSA) by prostate cancer cells, and increase prostate cancer cell death in vitro.Results from one in vitro study showed that prostate cancer cells were less susceptible to radiation -induced apoptosis when exposed to EGCG 30 minutes

    2. Prostate Cancer, Advanced or Metastatic - Treatment Options for Recurrent Prostate Cancer

      Standard treatment of recurrent prostate cancer may include the following:Chemotherapy.Biologic therapy with sipuleucel-T for patients already treated with hormone therapy.Hormone therapy.Radiation therapy.Prostatectomy for patients already treated with radiation therapy.Treatment to control pain from cancer that has spread to the bone may include the following:Pain medicine.External-beam radiation therapy.Internal radiation therapy with radioisotopes such as strontium-89.Targeted therapy with a monoclonal antibody.Check for U.S. clinical trials from NCI's list of cancer clinical trials that are now accepting patients with recurrent prostate cancer. For more specific results, refine the search by using other search features, such as the location of the trial, the type of treatment, or the name of the drug. General information about clinical trials is available from the NCI Web site.

    3. Prostate Cancer, Nutrition, and Dietary Supplements (PDQ®): Complementary and alternative medicine - Patient Information [NCI] - Questions and Answers About Green Tea

      What is green tea?Tea has been consumed in Asia since ancient times. Sailors first brought tea to England in the 17th century. Other than water, tea is the most widely consumed beverage in the world. Tea comes from the Camellia sinensis plant. The way the leaves of this plant are processed determines the type of tea produced. Many of the possible health benefits studied in green tea are thought to be from compounds called polyphenols. Polyphenols are a large group of plant chemicals that include catechins (antioxidants that help protect cells from damage caused by free radicals).Catechins make up most of the polyphenols in green tea. The most active catechin in green tea is epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG).To make green tea, the tea leaves are roasted in a wok (or, historically, steamed) to preserve the catechins and retain freshness. Black tea is made using a process that causes the catechins and other compounds in the leaves to oxidize, producing darker colored tea. Oolong tea is

    4. Genetics of Prostate Cancer (PDQ®): Genetics - Health Professional Information [NCI] - Overview

      Note: Separate PDQ summaries on Prostate Cancer Screening,Prostate Cancer Treatment,and Levels of Evidence for Cancer Screening and Prevention Studies are also available. Benefits From Finasteride and Dutasteride Chemoprevention Based on solid evidence,chemoprevention with finasteride and dutasteride reduces the incidence of prostate cancer,but the evidence is inadequate to determine whether ...

    5. Prostate Cancer, Advanced or Metastatic - Questions or Comments About This Summary

      If you have questions or comments about this summary, please send them to Cancer.gov through the Web site's Contact Form. We can respond only to email messages written in English.

    6. Prostate Cancer Screening (PDQ®): Screening - Health Professional Information [NCI] - General Information About Prostate Cancer

      Prostate cancer is a disease in which malignant (cancer) cells form in the tissues of the prostate. The prostate is a gland in the male reproductive system located just below the bladder (the organ that collects and empties urine) and in front of the rectum (the lower part of the intestine). It is about the size of a walnut and surrounds part of the urethra (the tube that empties urine from the

    7. Prostate Cancer, Advanced or Metastatic - Get More Information From NCI

      Call 1-800-4-CANCERFor more information, U.S. residents may call the National Cancer Institute's (NCI's) Cancer Information Service toll-free at 1-800-4-CANCER (1-800-422-6237) Monday through Friday from 8:00 a.m. to 8:00 p.m., Eastern Time. A trained Cancer Information Specialist is available to answer your questions.Chat online The NCI's LiveHelp® online chat service provides Internet users with the ability to chat online with an Information Specialist. The service is available from 8:00 a.m. to 11:00 p.m. Eastern time, Monday through Friday. Information Specialists can help Internet users find information on NCI Web sites and answer questions about cancer. Write to usFor more information from the NCI, please write to this address:NCI Public Inquiries Office9609 Medical Center Dr. Room 2E532 MSC 9760Bethesda, MD 20892-9760Search the NCI Web siteThe NCI Web site provides online access to information on cancer, clinical trials, and other Web sites and organizations that offer support

    8. Prostate Cancer Prevention (PDQ®): Prevention - Patient Information [NCI] - Introduction

      Many of the medical and scientific terms used in this summary are found in the NCI Dictionary of Genetics Terms. When a linked term is clicked,the definition will appear in a separate window. The public health burden of prostate cancer is substantial. A total of 186,320 new cases of prostate cancer and 28,660 deaths from the disease are anticipated in the United States in 2008,making it the ...

    9. Prostate Cancer, Advanced or Metastatic - Introduction

      This complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) information summary provides an overview of the use of various foods and dietary supplements for reducing the risk of developing prostate cancer or for treating prostate cancer. This summary includes the history of research on the following six different foods or dietary supplements, reviews of laboratory and animal studies, and results of clinical trials.Green tea.Lycopene.Modified citrus pectin.Pomegranate.Soy.Zyflamend.Each type of dietary supplement or food will have a dedicated section in the summary, and new topics will be added over time.Prostate cancer is the most common noncutaneous cancer affecting men in the United States. From 2004 to 2008, the median age of diagnosis of prostate cancer was 67, and the incidence rate was 156 cases per 100,000 men per year.[1]Many studies suggest that CAM use is common among prostate cancer patients, and the use of vitamins, supplements, and specific foods is frequently reported by these

    10. Prostate Cancer Screening (PDQ®): Screening - Health Professional Information [NCI] - Stage I Prostate Cancer Treatment

      OverviewStage I prostate cancer is defined by the American Joint Committee on Cancer's TNM classification system:[1]T1a–c, N0, M0, prostate-specific antigen (PSA) <10 ng/ml, Gleason ≤6.T2a, N0, M0, PSA <10 ng/ml, Gleason ≤6.T1–2a, N0, M0, PSA X, Gleason X.The frequency of clinically silent, nonmetastatic prostate cancer that can be found at autopsy greatly increases with age and may be as high as 50% to 60% in men aged 90 years and older. Undoubtedly, the incidental discovery of these occult cancers at prostatic surgery performed for other reasons accounts for the similar survival of men with stage I prostate cancer, compared with the normal male population, adjusted for age. Many stage I cancers are well differentiated and only focally involve the gland (T1a, N0, M0); most require no treatment other than careful follow-up.[2]In younger patients (aged 50–60 years) whose expected survival is long, treatment should be considered.[3] Radical

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