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Medical Reference Related to Prostate Cancer

  1. Prostate Cancer, Nutrition, and Dietary Supplements (PDQ®): Complementary and alternative medicine - Patient Information [NCI] - Questions and Answers About Soy

    What is soy?The soybean plant has been grown in Asia for food since ancient times. Soy first arrived in Europe and North America in the 18th century. The soybean can be processed into a wide variety of products including soy milk, miso, tofu, soy flour, and oil. Soy foods contain many phytochemicals that may have health benefits. Isoflavones are the most widely researched compounds in soy. Major isoflavones in the soybean include genistein (which may be the most bioactive isoflavone), daidzein, and glycitein. Isoflavones protect the soybean plant from stress and have antioxidant, antimicrobial, and antifungal actions.Isoflavones are phytoestrogens (estrogen -like substances found in plants) that attach to estrogen receptors in cells. Genistein has been shown to affect many pathways in prostate cancer cells involved in the growth and spread of cancer. How is soy administered or consumed? Soy may be consumed in the diet or taken in dietary supplements. Have any preclinical (laboratory

  2. Prostate Cancer Treatment (PDQ®): Treatment - Patient Information [NCI] - Treatment Options for Recurrent Prostate Cancer

    Standard treatment of recurrent prostate cancer may include the following:Chemotherapy.Biologic therapy with sipuleucel-T for patients already treated with hormone therapy.Hormone therapy.Radiation therapy.Prostatectomy for patients already treated with radiation therapy.Treatment to control pain from cancer that has spread to the bone may include the following:Pain medicine.External-beam radiation therapy.Internal radiation therapy with radioisotopes such as strontium-89.Targeted therapy with a monoclonal antibody.Check for U.S. clinical trials from NCI's list of cancer clinical trials that are now accepting patients with recurrent prostate cancer. For more specific results, refine the search by using other search features, such as the location of the trial, the type of treatment, or the name of the drug. General information about clinical trials is available from the NCI Web site.

  3. Prostate Cancer, Nutrition, and Dietary Supplements (PDQ®): Complementary and alternative medicine - Patient Information [NCI] - Changes to This Summary (06 / 10 / 2013)

    The PDQ cancer information summaries are reviewed regularly and updated as new information becomes available. This section describes the latest changes made to this summary as of the date above. Changes were made to this summary to match those made to the health professional version.

  4. Prostate Cancer Treatment (PDQ®): Treatment - Patient Information [NCI] - Treatment Option Overview

    There are different types of treatment for patients with prostate cancer. Different types of treatment are available for patients with prostate cancer. Some treatments are standard (the currently used treatment), and some are being tested in clinical trials. A treatment clinical trial is a research study meant to help improve current treatments or obtain information on new treatments for patients with cancer. When clinical trials show that a new treatment is better than the standard treatment, the new treatment may become the standard treatment. Patients may want to think about taking part in a clinical trial. Some clinical trials are open only to patients who have not started treatment.Eight types of standard treatment are used:Watchful waiting or active surveillanceWatchful waiting and active surveillance are treatments used for older men who do not have symptoms or have other medical conditions and for men whose prostate cancer is found during a screening test.Watchful waiting is

  5. Prostate Cancer Prevention (PDQ®): Prevention - Patient Information [NCI] - Prostate Cancer Prevention

    Avoiding risk factors and increasing protective factors may help prevent cancer.Avoiding cancer risk factors may help prevent certain cancers. Risk factors include smoking, being overweight, and not getting enough exercise. Increasing protective factors such as quitting smoking, eating a healthy diet, and exercising may also help prevent some cancers. Talk to your doctor or other health care professional about how you might lower your risk of cancer.The following risk factors may increase the risk of prostate cancer:Age Prostate cancer is rare in men younger than 50 years of age. The chance of developing prostate cancer increases as men get older.Family history of prostate cancer A man whose father, brother, or son has had prostate cancer has a higher-than-average risk of prostate cancer.Race Prostate cancer occurs more often in African-American men than in white men. African-American men with prostate cancer are more likely to die from the disease than white men with prostate

  6. Prostate Cancer Screening (PDQ®): Screening - Health Professional Information [NCI] - Significance

    Incidence and MortalityProstate cancer is the most common cancer diagnosed in North American men, excluding skin cancers. It is estimated that in 2013, approximately 238,590 new cases and 29,720 prostate cancer-related deaths will occur in the United States.[1] Prostate cancer is now the second leading cause of cancer death in men, exceeded only by lung cancer. It accounts for 28% of all male cancers and 10% of male cancer-related deaths.[1] Age-adjusted incidence rates increased steadily over the past several decades, with particularly dramatic increases associated with the inception of widespread use of prostate-specific antigen (PSA) screening in the late 1980s and early 1990s, followed by a more recent fall in incidence. Age-adjusted mortality rates have recently paralleled incidence rates, with an increase followed by a decrease in the early 1990s.[2] It has been suggested that declines in mortality rates in certain jurisdictions reflect the benefit of PSA screening,[3] but

  7. Prostate Cancer, Nutrition, and Dietary Supplements (PDQ®): Complementary and alternative medicine - Health Professional Information [NCI] - nci_ncicdr0000719335-nci-header

    This information is produced and provided by the National Cancer Institute (NCI). The information in this topic may have changed since it was written. For the most current information, contact the National Cancer Institute via the Internet web site at http://cancer.gov or call 1-800-4-CANCER.Prostate Cancer, Nutrition, and Dietary Supplements

  8. Prostate Cancer Treatment (PDQ®): Treatment - Patient Information [NCI] - Treatment Options by Stage

    A link to a list of current clinical trials is included for each treatment section. For some types or stages of cancer, there may not be any trials listed. Check with your doctor for clinical trials that are not listed here but may be right for you.Stage I Prostate CancerStandard treatment of stage I prostate cancer may include the following:Watchful waiting.Active surveillance. If the cancer begins to grow, hormone therapy may be given.Radical prostatectomy, usually with pelvic lymphadenectomy. Radiation therapy may be given after surgery.External-beam radiation therapy. Hormone therapy may be given after radiation therapy.Internal radiation therapy with radioactive seeds.A clinical trial of high-intensity focused ultrasound.A clinical trial of cryosurgery.Check for U.S. clinical trials from NCI's list of cancer clinical trials that are now accepting patients with stage I prostate cancer. For more specific results, refine the search by using other search features, such as the

  9. Prostate Cancer, Nutrition, and Dietary Supplements (PDQ®): Complementary and alternative medicine - Health Professional Information [NCI] - About This PDQ Summary

    Purpose of This SummaryThis PDQ cancer information summary for health professionals provides comprehensive, peer-reviewed, evidence-based information about prostate cancer. It is intended as a resource to inform and assist clinicians who care for cancer patients. It does not provide formal guidelines or recommendations for making health care decisions.Reviewers and UpdatesThis summary is reviewed regularly and updated as necessary by the PDQ Cancer Complementary and Alternative Medicine Editorial Board, which is editorially independent of the National Cancer Institute (NCI). The summary reflects an independent review of the literature and does not represent a policy statement of NCI or the National Institutes of Health (NIH). Board members review recently published articles each month to determine whether an article should:be discussed at a meeting,be cited with text, orreplace or update an existing article that is already cited.Changes to the summaries are made through a consensus

  10. Prostate Cancer Treatment (PDQ®): Treatment - Patient Information [NCI] - To Learn More About Prostate Cancer

    For more information from the National Cancer Institute about prostate cancer, see the following:Prostate Cancer Home PageWhat You Need to Know About™ Prostate CancerProstate Cancer PreventionProstate Cancer ScreeningDrugs Approved for Prostate CancerProstate-Specific Antigen (PSA) TestTreatment Choices for Men with Early-Stage Prostate CancerCryosurgery in Cancer Treatment: Questions and AnswersFor general cancer information and other resources from the National Cancer Institute, see the following:What You Need to Know About™ CancerUnderstanding Cancer Series: CancerCancer StagingChemotherapy and You: Support for People With CancerRadiation Therapy and You: Support for People With CancerCoping with Cancer: Supportive and Palliative CareQuestions to Ask Your Doctor About CancerCancer LibraryInformation For Survivors/Caregivers/Advocates

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