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Medical Reference Related to Prostate Cancer

  1. Genetics of Prostate Cancer (PDQ®): Genetics - Health Professional Information [NCI] - Changes to This Summary (08 / 15 / 2013)

    The PDQ cancer information summaries are reviewed regularly and updated as new information becomes available. This section describes the latest changes made to this summary as of the date above.This summary was comprehensively reviewed and extensively revised.This summary is written and maintained by the PDQ Cancer Genetics Editorial Board, which is editorially independent of NCI. The summary reflects an independent review of the literature and does not represent a policy statement of NCI or NIH. More information about summary policies and the role of the PDQ Editorial Boards in maintaining the PDQ summaries can be found on the About This PDQ Summary and PDQ NCI's Comprehensive Cancer Database pages.

  2. Prostate Cancer Treatment (PDQ®): Treatment - Patient Information [NCI] - Get More Information From NCI

    Call 1-800-4-CANCERFor more information, U.S. residents may call the National Cancer Institute's (NCI's) Cancer Information Service toll-free at 1-800-4-CANCER (1-800-422-6237) Monday through Friday from 8:00 a.m. to 8:00 p.m., Eastern Time. A trained Cancer Information Specialist is available to answer your questions.Chat online The NCI's LiveHelp® online chat service provides Internet users with the ability to chat online with an Information Specialist. The service is available from 8:00 a.m. to 11:00 p.m. Eastern time, Monday through Friday. Information Specialists can help Internet users find information on NCI Web sites and answer questions about cancer. Write to usFor more information from the NCI, please write to this address:NCI Public Inquiries Office9609 Medical Center Dr. Room 2E532 MSC 9760Bethesda, MD 20892-9760Search the NCI Web siteThe NCI Web site provides online access to information on cancer, clinical trials, and other Web sites and organizations that offer support

  3. Questions and Answers About Zyflamend

    What is Zyflamend?Zyflamend is a dietary supplement that contains 10 different herbs. Zyflamend contains extracts of rosemary, turmeric, ginger, holy basil, green tea, hu zhang (Polygonum cuspidatum, a source of resveratrol), Chinese goldthread, barberry, oregano, and Baikal skullcap.The extracts found in Zyflamend have anti-inflammatory activity and possible anticancer benefits. There is limited evidence about how Zyflamend may act against tumor growth. Zyflamend has been shown to interfere with the activity of COX-1 and COX-2 enzymes, which are involved in the development of inflammation and possibly cancer. Zyflamend may also act against the NF-kappa B and lipoxygenase (LOX) families of proteins that stimulate tumor growth. How is Zyflamend administered or consumed?Zyflamend is taken as a dietary supplement in capsule form. Have any preclinical (laboratory or animal) studies been conducted using Zyflamend?Laboratory and animal research has recently been done to study the effects of

  4. Prostate Cancer, Nutrition, and Dietary Supplements (PDQ®): Complementary and alternative medicine - Patient Information [NCI] - Questions to Ask Your Health Care Provider About CAM

    When considering complementary and alternative therapies, patients should ask their health care provider the following questions: What side effects can be expected?What are the risks associated with this therapy?Do the known benefits outweigh the risks?What benefits can be expected from this therapy?Will the therapy interfere with conventional treatment?Is this therapy part of a clinical trial?If so, who is sponsoring the trial?Will the therapy be covered by health insurance?

  5. Prostate Cancer Screening (PDQ®): Screening - Health Professional Information [NCI] - Summary of Evidence

    Note: Separate PDQ summaries on Prevention of Prostate Cancer,Prostate Cancer Treatment,and Levels of Evidence for Cancer Screening and Prevention Studies are also available. Digital Rectal Examination and Prostate-Specific Antigen Benefits The evidence is insufficient to determine whether screening for prostate cancer with prostate-specific antigen (PSA) or digital rectal exam (DRE) reduces ...

  6. Stage I Prostate Cancer Treatment

    OverviewStage I prostate cancer is defined by the American Joint Committee on Cancer's TNM classification system:[1]T1a–c, N0, M0, prostate-specific antigen (PSA) <10 ng/ml, Gleason ≤6.T2a, N0, M0, PSA <10 ng/ml, Gleason ≤6.T1–2a, N0, M0, PSA X, Gleason X.The frequency of clinically silent, nonmetastatic prostate cancer that can be found at autopsy greatly increases with age and may be as high as 50% to 60% in men aged 90 years and older. Undoubtedly, the incidental discovery of these occult cancers at prostatic surgery performed for other reasons accounts for the similar survival of men with stage I prostate cancer, compared with the normal male population, adjusted for age. Many stage I cancers are well differentiated and only focally involve the gland (T1a, N0, M0); most require no treatment other than careful follow-up.[2]In younger patients (aged 50–60 years) whose expected survival is long, treatment should be considered.[3] Radical

  7. Prostate Cancer Treatment (PDQ®): Treatment - Health Professional Information [NCI] - Get More Information From NCI

    Call 1-800-4-CANCERFor more information, U.S. residents may call the National Cancer Institute's (NCI's) Cancer Information Service toll-free at 1-800-4-CANCER (1-800-422-6237) Monday through Friday from 8:00 a.m. to 8:00 p.m., Eastern Time. A trained Cancer Information Specialist is available to answer your questions.Chat online The NCI's LiveHelp® online chat service provides Internet users with the ability to chat online with an Information Specialist. The service is available from 8:00 a.m. to 11:00 p.m. Eastern time, Monday through Friday. Information Specialists can help Internet users find information on NCI Web sites and answer questions about cancer. Write to usFor more information from the NCI, please write to this address:NCI Public Inquiries Office9609 Medical Center Dr. Room 2E532 MSC 9760Bethesda, MD 20892-9760Search the NCI Web siteThe NCI Web site provides online access to information on cancer, clinical trials, and other Web sites and organizations that offer support

  8. Prostate Cancer, Nutrition, and Dietary Supplements (PDQ®): Complementary and alternative medicine - Health Professional Information [NCI] - Introduction

    This complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) information summary provides an overview of the use of various foods and dietary supplements for reducing the risk of developing prostate cancer or for treating prostate cancer. This summary includes the history of research on the following six different foods or dietary supplements, reviews of laboratory and animal studies, and results of clinical trials.Green tea.Lycopene.Modified citrus pectin.Pomegranate.Soy.Zyflamend.Each type of dietary supplement or food will have a dedicated section in the summary, and new topics will be added over time.Prostate cancer is the most common noncutaneous cancer affecting men in the United States. From 2004 to 2008, the median age of diagnosis of prostate cancer was 67, and the incidence rate was 156 cases per 100,000 men per year.[1]Many studies suggest that CAM use is common among prostate cancer patients, and the use of vitamins, supplements, and specific foods is frequently reported by these

  9. Prostate Cancer Treatment (PDQ®): Treatment - Health Professional Information [NCI] - Stage IV Prostate Cancer Treatment

    OverviewStage IV prostate cancer is defined by the American Joint Committee on Cancer's TNM classification system:[1]T4, N0, M0, any prostate-specific antigen (PSA), any Gleason.Any T, N1, M0, any PSA, any Gleason.Any T, any N, M1, any PSA, any Gleason.Extraprostatic extension with microscopic bladder neck invasion (T4) is included with T3a.Treatment selection depends on the following factors:Age.Coexisting medical illnesses.Symptoms.The presence of distant metastases (most often bone) or regional lymph node involvement only.The most common symptoms originate from the urinary tract or from bone metastases. Palliation of symptoms from the urinary tract with transurethral resection of the prostate (TURP) or radiation therapy and palliation of symptoms from bone metastases with radiation therapy or hormonal therapy are an important part of the management of these patients. Bisphosphonates may also be used for the management of bone

  10. Prostate Cancer Screening (PDQ®): Screening - Patient Information [NCI] - nci_ncicdr0000258032-nci-header

    This information is produced and provided by the National Cancer Institute (NCI). The information in this topic may have changed since it was written. For the most current information, contact the National Cancer Institute via the Internet web site at http://cancer.gov or call 1-800-4-CANCER.Prostate Cancer Screening

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