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Medical Reference Related to Prostate Cancer

  1. Changes to This Summary (11 / 02 / 2012)

    The PDQ cancer information summaries are reviewed regularly and updated as new information becomes available. This section describes the latest changes made to this summary as of the date above. Changes were made to this summary to match those made to the health professional version.

  2. Stages of Prostate Cancer

    After prostate cancer has been diagnosed,tests are done to find out if cancer cells have spread within the prostate or to other parts of the body. The process used to find out if cancer has spread within the prostate or to other parts of the body is called staging. The information gathered from the staging process determines the stage of the disease. It is important to know the stage in order .

  3. General CAM Information

    Complementary and alternative medicine (CAM)—also referred to as integrative medicine—includes a broad range of healing philosophies, approaches, and therapies. A therapy is generally called complementary when it is used in addition to conventional treatments; it is often called alternative when it is used instead of conventional treatment. (Conventional treatments are those that are widely accepted and practiced by the mainstream medical community.) Depending on how they are used, some therapies can be considered either complementary or alternative. Complementary and alternative therapies are used in an effort to prevent illness, reduce stress, prevent or reduce side effects and symptoms, or control or cure disease. Unlike conventional treatments for cancer, complementary and alternative therapies are often not covered by insurance companies. Patients should check with their insurance provider to find out about coverage for complementary and alternative therapies. Cancer patients

  4. Significance

    Incidence and Mortality Carcinoma of the prostate is the most common tumor in men in the United States,with 234,460 new cases and 27,350 deaths expected in 2006.[ 1 ] A wide range of estimates of the impact of the disease are notable. The disease is histologically evident in as many as 34% of men in their fifth decade and in up to 70% of men aged 80 years and older.[ 2,3 ] Prostate cancer ...

  5. About PDQ

    PDQ IS A COMPREHENSIVE CANCER DATABASE AVAILABLE ON NCI'S WEB SITE. PDQ is the National Cancer Institute's (NCI's) comprehensive cancer information database. Most of the information contained in PDQ is available online at NCI's Web site. PDQ is provided as a service of the NCI. The NCI is part of the National Institutes of Health,the federal government's focal point for biomedical research. .

  6. Stage IV Prostate Cancer Treatment

    OverviewStage IV prostate cancer is defined by the American Joint Committee on Cancer's TNM classification system:[1]T4, N0, M0, any prostate-specific antigen (PSA), any Gleason.Any T, N1, M0, any PSA, any Gleason.Any T, any N, M1, any PSA, any Gleason.Extraprostatic extension with microscopic bladder neck invasion (T4) is included with T3a.Treatment selection depends on the following factors:Age.Coexisting medical illnesses.Symptoms.The presence of distant metastases (most often bone) or regional lymph node involvement only.The most common symptoms originate from the urinary tract or from bone metastases. Palliation of symptoms from the urinary tract with transurethral resection of the prostate (TURP) or radiation therapy and palliation of symptoms from bone metastases with radiation therapy or hormonal therapy are an important part of the management of these patients. Bisphosphonates may also be used for the management of bone

  7. Changes to This Summary (04 / 05 / 2013)

    The PDQ cancer information summaries are reviewed regularly and updated as new information becomes available. This section describes the latest changes made to this summary as of the date above.This summary has been reformatted. The content has been reorganized, and some content has been added.This summary is written and maintained by the PDQ Adult Treatment Editorial Board, which is editorially independent of NCI. The summary reflects an independent review of the literature and does not represent a policy statement of NCI or NIH. More information about summary policies and the role of the PDQ Editorial Boards in maintaining the PDQ summaries can be found on the About This PDQ Summary and PDQ NCI's Comprehensive Cancer Database pages.

  8. Changes to This Summary (01 / 10 / 2013)

    The PDQ cancer information summaries are reviewed regularly and updated as new information becomes available. This section describes the latest changes made to this summary as of the date above. Changes were made to this summary to match those made to the health professional version.

  9. Stage I Prostate Cancer Treatment

    OverviewStage I prostate cancer is defined by the American Joint Committee on Cancer's TNM classification system:[1]T1a–c, N0, M0, prostate-specific antigen (PSA) <10 ng/ml, Gleason ≤6.T2a, N0, M0, PSA <10 ng/ml, Gleason ≤6.T1–2a, N0, M0, PSA X, Gleason X.The frequency of clinically silent, nonmetastatic prostate cancer that can be found at autopsy greatly increases with age and may be as high as 50% to 60% in men aged 90 years and older. Undoubtedly, the incidental discovery of these occult cancers at prostatic surgery performed for other reasons accounts for the similar survival of men with stage I prostate cancer, compared with the normal male population, adjusted for age. Many stage I cancers are well differentiated and only focally involve the gland (T1a, N0, M0); most require no treatment other than careful follow-up.[2]In younger patients (aged 50–60 years) whose expected survival is long, treatment should be considered.[3] Radical

  10. Stage III Prostate Cancer Treatment

    OverviewStage III prostate cancer is defined by the American Joint Committee on Cancer's TNM classification system:[1]T3a–b, N0, M0, any prostate-specific antigen (PSA), any Gleason.Extraprostatic extension with microscopic bladder neck invasion (T4) is included with T3a.External-beam radiation therapy (EBRT), interstitial implantation of radioisotopes, and radical prostatectomy are used to treat stage III prostate cancer.[2] Prognosis is greatly affected by whether regional lymph nodes are evaluated and proven not to be involved. EBRT using a linear accelerator is the most common treatment for patients with stage III prostate cancer, and large series support its success in achieving local disease control and disease-free survival (DFS).[3,4] The results of radical prostatectomy in stage III patients are greatly inferior compared with results in patients with stage II cancer. Interstitial implantation of radioisotopes is

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