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Medical Reference Related to Prostate Cancer

  1. Prostate Cancer Screening

    Tests are used to screen for different types of cancer. Some screening tests are used because they have been shown to be helpful both in finding cancers early and decreasing the chance of dying from these cancers. Other tests are used because they have been shown to find cancer in some people; however,it has not been proven in clinical trials that use of these tests will decrease the risk of ...

  2. Evidence of Benefit

    Prior to the 1990s,the digital rectal examination (DRE) was the test traditionally mentioned for prostate cancer screening. Two other test procedures are also available: transrectal ultrasound (TRUS) imaging and serum prostate-specific antigen (PSA) concentrations.[ 1 ] Prostate cancer screening is controversial because of the lack of definitive evidence of benefit. A small randomized trial in .

  3. Changes to This Summary (02 / 15 / 2013)

    The PDQ cancer information summaries are reviewed regularly and updated as new information becomes available. This section describes the latest changes made to this summary as of the date above.IntroductionUpdated statistics with estimated new cases and deaths for 2013 (cited American Cancer Society as reference 1).Updated statistics with age-specific probabilities of being diagnosed with prostate cancer in 2013.Genes With Potential Clinical Relevance in Prostate Cancer Risk This section was comprehensively reviewed and extensively revised.Methods of Prostate Cancer Genetic ResearchAdded American Cancer Society as reference 4.Added 2q37 to the list of chromosomal regions with modest-to-strong statistical significance (logarithm of the odds score ≥2) identified by genome-wide linkage studies of families with prostate cancer (cited Cropp et al. as reference 87). Added text about a study of 10,501 prostate cancer cases and 10,831 controls from multiple cohorts who were genotyped for

  4. Stage IV Prostate Cancer Treatment

    OverviewStage IV prostate cancer is defined by the American Joint Committee on Cancer's TNM classification system:[1]T4, N0, M0, any prostate-specific antigen (PSA), any Gleason.Any T, N1, M0, any PSA, any Gleason.Any T, any N, M1, any PSA, any Gleason.Extraprostatic extension with microscopic bladder neck invasion (T4) is included with T3a.Treatment selection depends on the following factors:Age.Coexisting medical illnesses.Symptoms.The presence of distant metastases (most often bone) or regional lymph node involvement only.The most common symptoms originate from the urinary tract or from bone metastases. Palliation of symptoms from the urinary tract with transurethral resection of the prostate (TURP) or radiation therapy and palliation of symptoms from bone metastases with radiation therapy or hormonal therapy are an important part of the management of these patients. Bisphosphonates may also be used for the management of bone

  5. Questions and Answers About Green Tea

    What is green tea?Tea has been consumed in Asia since ancient times. Sailors first brought tea to England in the 17th century. Other than water, tea is the most widely consumed beverage in the world. All tea comes from the Camellia sinensis plant. The way the leaves of this plant are processed determines the type of tea produced. To make green tea, the tea leaves are steamed and dried; this causes very little oxidation (a chemical reaction that takes place when a substance comes into contact with oxygen or another oxidizing substance). Black tea is made by crushing tea leaves to cause full oxidation. Oolong tea is made from partially oxidized leaves.Some studies suggest that green tea may protect against cardiovascular disease and some types of cancer. Clinical trials designed to study whether green tea is useful in treating prostate cancer are in the early stages. There is not enough evidence to show whether green tea is effective in treating prostate cancer.Many of the possible

  6. Overview of CAM Use in Prostate Cancer

    Studies of CAM use to treat prostate cancer have shown the following:Men who have prostate cancer are more likely to take dietary supplements than men who do not have prostate cancer.Prostate cancer patients with the healthiest eating habits (for example, eating lots of fish rich in omega-3 fatty acids and vegetables) are the most likely to take dietary supplements.Popular dietary supplements used by prostate cancer patients include lycopene, vitamin E, selenium, and saw palmetto.Reasons given by prostate cancer patients for using CAM treatments include boosting the immune system, improving quality of life, and lowering the risk of the cancer coming back.Studies of CAM use to lower the risk of developing prostate cancer or to prevent it from coming back have shown the following:A study of men with a family history of prostate cancer found that over half used vitamins or other dietary supplements, including those sold for prostate health or cancer prevention such as selenium, green

  7. Treatment Options by Stage

    Stage I Prostate Cancer Treatment of stage I prostate cancer may include the following: Watchful waiting. Radical prostatectomy,usually with pelvic lymphadenectomy,with or without radiation therapy after surgery. It may be possible to remove the prostate without damaging nerves that are necessary for an erection. External-beam radiation therapy. Implant radiation therapy. A clinical trial ...

  8. General CAM Information

    Complementary and alternative medicine (CAM)—also referred to as integrative medicine—includes a broad range of healing philosophies, approaches, and therapies. A therapy is generally called complementary when it is used in addition to conventional treatments; it is often called alternative when it is used instead of conventional treatment. (Conventional treatments are those that are widely accepted and practiced by the mainstream medical community.) Depending on how they are used, some therapies can be considered either complementary or alternative. Complementary and alternative therapies are used in an effort to prevent illness, reduce stress, prevent or reduce side effects and symptoms, or control or cure disease. Unlike conventional treatments for cancer, complementary and alternative therapies are often not covered by insurance companies. Patients should check with their insurance provider to find out about coverage for complementary and alternative therapies. Cancer patients

  9. Get More Information From NCI

    National Cancer Institute for more cancer information.

  10. Get More Information From NCI

    Sources of further information about Prostate Cancer Treatment.

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