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Diet, Exercise May Slow Early Prostate Cancer

Study: No Men Required Prostate Cancer Treatment After Following Intensive Program for 1 Year

No Treatment Required

After one year in the program, PSA levels decreased, on average, by 4% in the intensive diet group but increased by 6% in the second group.

None of the participants in the intensive diet group required treatment due to prostate cancer progression.

However, six men in the second group required conventional prostate cancer treatment - surgery, radiation, and/or hormone therapy - within the first year.

The researchers took it a step further and also tested how blood samples from the men affected prostate cancer cell growth in the lab.

Blood samples from the intensive diet group slowed prostate cancer cell growth by 70% in the lab but only by 9% in the second group.

"Changes in diet and lifestyle that we found in earlier research could reverse the progression of coronary heart disease may also affect the progression of prostate cancer," says Dean Ornish, MD, clinical professor at the University of California, San Francisco, in a news release.

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