Find Information About:

Drugs & Supplements

Get information and reviews on prescription drugs, over-the-counter medications, vitamins, and supplements. Search by name or medical condition.

Pill Identifier

Pill Identifier

Having trouble identifying your pills?

Enter the shape, color, or imprint of your prescription or OTC drug. Our pill identification tool will display pictures that you can compare to your pill.

Get Started

My Medicine

Save your medicine, check interactions, sign up for FDA alerts, create family profiles and more.

Get Started

WebMD Health Experts and Community

Talk to health experts and other people like you in WebMD's Communities. It's a safe forum where you can create or participate in support groups and discussions about health topics that interest you.

  • Second Opinion

    Second Opinion

    Read expert perspectives on popular health topics.

  • Community


    Connect with people like you, and get expert guidance on living a healthy life.

Got a health question? Get answers provided by leading organizations, doctors, and experts.

Get Answers

Sign up to receive WebMD's award-winning content delivered to your inbox.

Sign Up

Font Size

Stopping Hormone Therapy May Shorten Men's Lives

Prostate Cancer Patients on Continuous Hormone Therapy Lived Longer Than Patients Given Intermittent Treatment, Study Finds

Continuous ADT Beats Out Intermittent ADT

The late-stage international study involved men with hormone-sensitive cancers that had spread beyond the prostate. All were given androgen deprivation therapy with Zoladex and Casodex for seven months. Men who responded were divided into two groups, with one staying on continuous ADT and the other getting intermittent treatment. They were tracked for an average of more than nine years.

Results showed that "survival with intermittent hormone therapy was inferior to survival with continuous hormone therapy," Hussain says.

Men given continuous therapy lived an average of nearly six years, compared with about five years for men getting intermittent therapy.

Men with minimal disease spread (no cancer beyond the spine, pelvis, and lymph nodes) on continuous therapy lived an average of about seven years vs. five years for those treated intermittently -- a striking two-year difference, Hussain says.

Among men with more extensive disease spread, the gap in survival narrowed: about four-and-a-half years for continuous therapy vs. five years for intermittent treatment.

But Hussain says that even these men should not be offered treatment breaks, as further study is needed.

Overall, the men who got the stop-and-start treatment received about half the amount of hormone therapy as men who got continual ADT, says researcher David I. Quinn, MBBS, PhD, of the University of Southern California in Los Angeles.

As a result, intermittent therapy costs about half as much as continuous therapy, which he estimated at $340 to $440 a month for the two drugs used in the study. Both drugs are covered by insurance, Quinn says.

These findings were presented at a medical conference. They should be considered preliminary, as they have not yet undergone the "peer review" process, in which outside experts scrutinize the data prior to publication in a medical journal.

1 | 2

Today on WebMD

man with doctor
Symptoms, risks, treatments
man coughing
Men shouldn’t ignore
prostate cancer cells
What does this diagnosis mean?
doctor and male patient
Is it worth it?
cancer fighting foods
15 Cancer Symptoms Men Ignore
Prostate Enlarged
Picture Of The Prostate
Prostate Cancer Quiz
screening tests for men
Prostate Cancer Symptoms
Vitamin D