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    Biologic drugs are one type of medicine doctors use to treat moderate to severe rheumatoid arthritis (RA). They are work on your immune system to ease inflammation and damage in your joints.

    Use this list to get to know the different types.

    Abatacept (Orencia)

    How you take it: By injection or IV

    How often you take it: Depends on how you take it. You can get it by injection every week or by IV once a month.

    Most common side effects: Headache, cold, sore throat, and dizziness

    Your doctor should:

    • Test you for tuberculosis and hepatitis before you take it.
    • Check you for infections, including tuberculosis, while you take it.

    How it works: It blocks the immune system’s T cells to lower inflammation.

    Adalimumab (Humira)

    How you take it: By injection

    How often you take it: Once every 2 weeks

    Most common side effects: Colds, sinus infection, headache, and rash

    Your doctor should:

    • Test you for tuberculosis and hepatitis before you take it.
    • Check you for infections, including tuberculosis, while you take it.

    How it works: It targets tumor necrosis factor (TNF), a chemical your body makes that causes inflammation. Your doctor will call this type of drug a “TNF blocker.”

    Anakinra (Kineret)

    How you take it: By injection

    How often you take it: Daily

    Most common side effects: Pain or skin reactions in the area where you get the shot, colds, headache, and nausea.

    Your doctor should:

    • Test you for tuberculosis and hepatitis before you take it.
    • Check you for infections, including tuberculosis, while you take it.

    How it works: It targets interleukin-1, a chemical your body makes that causes inflammation. Your doctor will call this type of drug an "IL-1 blocker."

    Certolizumab (Cimzia)

    How you take it: By injection

    How often you take it: Usually every 2-4 weeks (your doctor will decide)

    Most common side effects: Flu or cold, rash, urinary tract infections

    Your doctor should:

    • Test you for tuberculosis and hepatitis before you take it.
    • Check you for infections, including tuberculosis, while you take it.

    How it works: It targets tumor necrosis factor (TNF), a chemical your body makes that causes inflammation. Your doctor will call this type of drug a “TNF blocker.”