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    Features Related to Rheumatoid Arthritis

    1. RA Medicines: Finding What You Need

      Living with rheumatoid arthritis usually means taking medication. "Treatments are working better than we could have imagined 15 years ago," says Clifton O. "Bing" Bingham, MD, director of the Johns Hopkins Arthritis Center in Baltimore. Thanks to aggressive treatment, symptoms like painful, swollen

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    2. How Rheumatoid Arthritis Affects Pregnancy

      If you're pregnant or planning to be, you may wonder how having rheumatoid arthritis (RA) could affect your pregnancy. Here's some good news: Many women with RA find that their symptoms go into remission during pregnancy. What’s more, RA doesn't seem to affect your chances of getting or staying preg

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    3. Traveling Pain-Free With RA

      Traveling with rheumatoid arthritis is a little more complicated, but it doesn't have to be less fun. "There's no reason you can't travel just because you have RA," says Victoria Ruffing, RN, program manager at the Johns Hopkins Arthritis Center in Baltimore. "You just need to take some extra precau

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    4. Complementary Treatments for RA: Acupuncture to Yoga

      Looking for new ways to soothe your stiff joints and other rheumatoid arthritis symptoms? Things like acupuncture, massage, or tai chi could help. About 2 out of 3 people with RA try these kinds of treatments, known as complementary therapies. They may ease your pain, relax you, and improve your lif

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    5. 8 Affordable Aids for Rheumatoid Arthritis

      Need a little help sometimes? Maybe you could use a hand when you get out of a chair, cook a meal, or write out a shopping list. You can make life with rheumatoid arthritis easier with a few gadgets that are easy on your wallet. "People say that they don't want to use an assistive device because the

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    6. Arthritis-Friendly Workouts to Keep You Moving

      Aerobic exercise -- like swimming, using cardio machines at the gym, or simply going for a brisk walk -- is not only possible when you have rheumatoid arthritis, it’s good for you, too. It's great for your heart and lungs, and it also: Helps you move better Makes everyday activities easier Lifts you

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    7. Flexibility Exercises to Help Your Rheumatoid Arthritis

      You can do gentle moves to ease pain, avoid injuries, and improve your balance. They help your joints work well. There are two basic types of flexibility exercises. Stretches keep your muscles elastic, which helps you move your joints more easily. Range-of-motion exercises keep your joints moving th

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    8. Strength Training for Your Rheumatoid Arthritis

      Strength training is good for you. It builds your muscles and helps support and protect joints that are affected by arthritis. “I recommend [it] across the board to my RA patients,” says Marvin Smith, DPT, a physical therapist at Oregon Health and Science University in Portland. Make it a habit, and

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    9. Why Yoga Can Be Good for Rheumatoid Arthritis

      Regular exercise makes a big difference when you have rheumatoid arthritis. "It's important to keep muscles strong to support the joints, and movement is important to reduce stiffness," says Susan J. Bartlett, PhD, an associate professor of medicine at McGill University in Montreal. Yoga can be a fu

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    10. Stress and RA: How to Stay in Control

      Hilary Wilson of Duluth, Ga., now 60, was officially diagnosed with rheumatoid arthritis or RA in 1987, but she is pretty sure she had the inflammatory arthritis long before that. RA is a chronic disease, marked by inflammation of the lining of the joints. It can lead to chronic joint pain, loss of

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