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News and Features Related to Rheumatoid Arthritis

  1. Shoulder Replacement May Help for Severe RA

    By Maureen Salamon HealthDay Reporter THURSDAY, Jan. 30, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- Although hip and knee replacements are common, a similar surgery to replace diseased shoulder joints also appears worthwhile for rheumatoid arthritis patients whose severe shoulder pain and stiffness can't be eased by

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  2. Breastfeeding Might Reduce Moms' Odds of RA

    By Robert Preidt HealthDay Reporter TUESDAY, Jan. 7, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- Women who breast-feed may have a lower risk of developing rheumatoid arthritis later in life, new research suggests. Researchers analyzed data from more than 7,300 women, aged 50 and older, in China who completed questionn

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  3. RA Patients See Big Boost in Quality of Life

    By Alan Mozes HealthDay Reporter TUESDAY, Dec. 3, 2013 (HealthDay News) -- Rheumatoid arthritis patients can generally look forward to a much better quality of life today than they did 20 years ago, new research suggests. The observation is based on a comparative multi-year tracking of more than 1,1

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  4. Arthritis-Friendly Workouts to Keep You Moving

    Aerobic exercise -- like swimming, using cardio machines at the gym, or simply going for a brisk walk -- is not only possible when you have rheumatoid arthritis, it’s good for you, too. It's great for your heart and lungs, and it also: Helps you move better Makes everyday activities easier Lifts you

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  5. Sugary Drinks and Rheumatoid Arthritis Linked?

    Nov. 1, 2013 (San Diego)- Women who drink one or more sugar-sweetened sodas a day might raise their risk of getting rheumatoid arthritis, according to a new study that links RA risk to the sugary habit. The study does not prove cause and effect. Other studies have linked sugary drinks to higher risk

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  6. Can You Have Both Rheumatoid Arthritis and Gout?

    Nov. 4, 2013 (San Diego) -- Rheumatoid arthritis and gout, another form of arthritis, may occur together, despite previous thinking that having both is rare, according to new research. Based on the new findings, doctors should consider looking for gout in RA patients, says study researcher Christina

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  7. Strength Training for Your Rheumatoid Arthritis

    Strength training is good for you. It builds your muscles and helps support and protect joints that are affected by arthritis. “I recommend [it] across the board to my RA patients,” says Marvin Smith, DPT, a physical therapist at Oregon Health and Science University in Portland. Make it a habit, and

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  8. Flexibility Exercises to Help Your Rheumatoid Arthritis

    You can do gentle moves to ease pain, avoid injuries, and improve your balance. They help your joints work well. There are two basic types of flexibility exercises. Stretches keep your muscles elastic, which helps you move your joints more easily. Range-of-motion exercises keep your joints moving th

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  9. Certain RA Drugs May Also Protect Patients' Hearts

    By Mary Elizabeth Dallas HealthDay Reporter SATURDAY, Oct. 26 (HealthDay News) -- Drugs that people with rheumatoid arthritis use to help ease the symptoms of the disease might also help ward off heart trouble, two new studies find. Researchers in Sweden found that so-called "biologic" drugs, known

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  10. Treating RA Early May Cut Damaging Effects

    By Robert Preidt HealthDay Reporter SATURDAY, Oct. 26 (HealthDay News) -- Immediate and effective treatment for rheumatoid arthritis reduces the risk that patients will have joint damage and disability within a few years, a new study suggests. The findings show the need for doctors to discourage pat

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