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News and Features Related to Rheumatoid Arthritis

  1. Standard RA Therapy as Good as Costlier Newcomer?

    By Steven Reinberg HealthDay Reporter TUESDAY, June 11 (HealthDay News) -- Newer, costlier treatment for rheumatoid arthritis appears no better than an older, less-expensive regimen for people who don't respond to the first-line drug methotrexate, a new study suggests. "Newer isn't always better," s

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  2. Combination Therapy for Rheumatoid Arthritis

    Rheumatoid arthritis is no longer as disabling a condition as it was in the past, thanks in large part to combination therapy - taking more than one RA medicine at a time. Doing so can lessen symptoms such as joint pain and slow joint damage. That can make a big difference in quality of life. "You s

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  3. Newer RA Drugs Don't Seem to Raise Shingles Risk

    By Serena Gordon HealthDay Reporter TUESDAY, March 5 (HealthDay News) -- The newest medications used to treat autoimmune diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis don't appear to raise the risk of developing shingles, new research indicates. There has been concern that these medications, called anti-tum

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  4. Sunshine Linked to Lower Rheumatoid Arthritis Risk

    By Robert Preidt HealthDay Reporter TUESDAY, Feb. 5 (HealthDay News) -- Older women who've had regular exposure to sunlight may be less likely to develop rheumatoid arthritis, new findings indicate. This beneficial effect -- which is believed to be due to ultraviolet B (UV-B) in sunlight -- was only

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  5. New Arthritis Drug Xeljanz Gets FDA Approval

    Nov. 6, 2012 -- The FDA has approved Pfizer's Xeljanz (tofacitinib), a first-of-its-kind treatment for rheumatoid arthritis. Xeljanz is approved for use by patients not helped by methotrexate, the usual first treatment for RA. It's a pill taken twice a day. Xeljanz is a type of drug called a Janus k

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  6. Pill Instead of a Needle May Soon Be Option for RA

    Aug. 8, 2012 -- A new pill may soon offer people with rheumatoid arthritis an alternative to the injections and intravenous infusions that many rely on to treat their disease. The drug, tofacitinib, is a twice-daily pill that works by turning down the body's immune attack on its own joints and organ

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  7. Gum Disease More Common in People With RA

    Aug. 8, 2012 -- People with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) may be up to four times more likely to have gum disease than people without this autoimmune disease. What's more, gum disease is often more severe in people with RA, a new study suggests. The findings, which appear in the Annals of Rheumatic Dise

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  8. Newer RA Drugs May Reduce Heart Risk

    June 8, 2012 -- Rheumatoid arthritis patients who take medications known as anti-TNFs may be treating more than their disease. According to new research presented at a European meeting, these patients may be less likely to have a heart attack and are more likely to live longer than those with RA who

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  9. Actemra Tops Rival in Rheumatoid Arthritis Study

    June 7, 2012 -- A new study shows that the drug Actemra may be a more effective treatment for rheumatoid arthritis than the drug Humira when the medications are used by themselves. Both medications are in a class called biologics, which are designed to inhibit parts of the immune system that cause i

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  10. Yoga May Improve Symptoms of Rheumatoid Arthritis

    May 24, 2012 (Honolulu, Hawaii) -- Young patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) may feel better after practicing yoga for just six weeks, a new study shows. Researchers reported their findings here last week at the American Pain Society's annual meeting. "It seems to be a very feasible, practical t

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