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    Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis: Serial Casting - Topic Overview

    Some children who have developed mild to moderate contractures (knees, ankles, wrists, fingers, elbows) may benefit from serial casting.

    Serial casting is a temporary straightening and casting of the affected joint (for about 2 days). The cast is then removed, the child goes through some physical therapy, and a new cast is applied with the joint stretched a bit more.

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    The procedure is repeated with the joint a little straighter each time. This process continues until maximal straightening has occurred. A resting splint may be worn at night for 3 to 6 months afterwards.

    Serial casting may be able to restore the ability to straighten a mildly contracted joint, but it is unlikely to improve severe contractures.

    WebMD Medical Reference from Healthwise

    Last Updated: /2, 14 1
    This information is not intended to replace the advice of a doctor. Healthwise disclaims any liability for the decisions you make based on this information.
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