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When Sex Is a Problem

Men have Viagra. But what about women with low libido?

WebMD Feature

June 12, 2000 -- The gods of sex have blessed men with Viagra, but what good is it if their female partners have lost interest?

Traditionally, men's sexual problems have gotten the lion's share of attention, prompting remedies from Viagra to vacuum erection pumps to penile implants. The focus has been mainly on men despite the fact that women are more likely to have sexual troubles. A survey published in the February 10, 1999 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association found that 43% of 1,749 women had complaints about sexual functioning, compared with 31% of the 1,410 men surveyed. Subjects ranged in age from 18 to 59. The women reported low sexual desire, problems with arousal, and pain during intercourse. And these problems increase with age, experts say.

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A Changing Picture

Why has research on women's sexual dysfunction, as it's medically known, lagged in the first place? It's partly due to the difficulty of defining the problem. Even though impotence in men can be organic or emotional, the inability to obtain or maintain an erection is often the target for therapy. In women, sexual problems can get more complicated. They can include, for instance, a lack of desire, insufficient lubrication, an inability to reach orgasm, or pain during intercourse. The causes can be physical, such as poor circulation, or emotional, such as stress or depression.

Finding remedies has also been a challenge because drugs that boost men's sex lives may do nothing for women's. A recent study of Viagra in women, released at the annual meeting of the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists, showed that it worked no better than a placebo in improving sexual response.

Lately, however, as researchers have discovered more about the types and causes of women's sexual problems, the outlook is becoming brighter. New drugs are in development specifically for women's sexual problems. And a new clitoral suction device, meant to enhance blood flow, has been approved by the FDA.

Though many of these remedies for women's sexual problems are months or even years away from druggists' shelves, there are still avenues to relief right now -- if a woman doesn't give up easily and finds the right doctor.

One Woman's Story

Peggie is one of those women who don't give up easily. She and her husband of 25 years had always enjoyed an active sex life. Then, at age 51, she started experiencing hot flashes and, along with them, something she never expected -- a loss of sexual desire.

"No one told me that when you hit menopause, forget about sex," she says. "It was a shock to me." Other women confided that their libidos had plummeted, too, with menopause. They told Peggie, "That's just the way it is when women age."

But like other women who came of age during the sexual revolution, Peggie felt that women's sexual pleasure is as important as men's. So she went looking for help.

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