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Sex During Pregnancy

Can I Have Sex During Pregnancy Without Harming my Baby?

There is no reason to change or alter your sex life during pregnancy unless your doctor advises otherwise. Intercourse or orgasm during pregnancy will not harm your baby, unless you have a medical problem. Remember that your baby is well protected in your uterus by the amniotic fluid that surrounds him or her.

Your doctor may recommend not having intercourse early in pregnancy if you have a history of miscarriages. Intercourse also may be restricted if you have certain complications of pregnancy, such as pre-term labor or bleeding. You may need to ask your doctor to clarify if this means no penetration, no orgasms, or no sexual arousal, because different complications may require different restrictions.

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How Can I Have Comfortable Sex During Pregnancy?

As your pregnancy progresses, changing positions may become necessary for your comfort. After the fourth month of pregnancy a woman may notice feeling dizzy or nauseated while lying flat on her back. This is related to the weight of the growing uterus pressing on major blood vessels. Positions may need to be altered at this time.

A water-based lubricant may be used during intercourse if necessary.

During intercourse, you should not feel pain. During orgasm, your uterus will contract. If you have any contractions that are painful or regular, contact your doctor. Also, discontinue intercourse and call your doctor immediately if you have heavy vaginal bleeding or if your water breaks (nothing should enter the vagina after your water breaks).

Talking to your partner about how you are feeling about sex and any concerns you have will help you stay comfortable. Also, encourage your partner to communicate with you, especially if you notice changes in your partner's responsiveness. Communicating can help you both better understand your feelings and desires.

Will My Sexual Desires Change During Pregnancy?

It is common for your sexual desires to be different now that you are pregnant. Changing hormones cause some women to experience an increased sex drive during pregnancy, while others may not be as interested in sex as they were before they became pregnant.

During the first trimester, some women commonly lose interest in sex because they are tired and uncomfortable, while other women's sexual desires stay the same.

I Don't Feel Like Having Sex. What Should I Do to Keep my Partner Happy?

If your doctor has limited your sexual activity, or if you are not in the mood for intercourse, remember to take time for intimacy with your partner. Being intimate does not require having intercourse -- love and affection can be expressed in many ways.

Remind yourselves of the love that created your developing baby. Enjoy your time together. You can take long romantic walks, enjoy candle-lit dinners, or give each other back rubs.

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