Skip to content
    Font Size
    A
    A
    A

    Love in the Time of Caller ID

    When we’re always in touch but never in reach, can true love blossom?
    By
    WebMD Feature
    Reviewed by Louise Chang, MD

    Just as FedEx, UPS, and DHL can send a package across the country overnight, CrazyBlindDate.com can set you up with a stranger in just a few hours -- when you absolutely, positively have to be with someone right now.

    Hey, if you can get a suit dry-cleaned in three hours, why not a first date?

    Recommended Related to Sex & Relationships

    Almost Perfect

    By Hugh O'NeilOne husband learns he's not the stuff his wife's fantasies are made of. Will his pride (and their marriage) survive? My wife and I were in bed one night, watching folksinger James Taylor on the tube, when my world was changed forever. "Now, he's my type," Jody purred hungrily. "Pardon me, doll?" I said, sure I'd heard her wrong. "He's my type," she repeated, suddenly aware of what she'd said and how she'd said it. "Your type?" I croaked. "Yeah, you know, all tall and lanky," she...

    Read the Almost Perfect article > >

    Using technology in the search for true love is certainly nothing new: In the 1899 hit song Hello Ma Baby, a young man entreats his lover to "send me a kiss by wire" and begs, "Oh baby, telephone, and tell me I'm your own."

    In 1965, when computers were still hulking monstrosities programmed by punch cards, a group of Harvard students, including future Supreme Court nominee Douglas H. Ginsburg, formed a company called Compatibility Research Inc., which attempted to apply digital science to the art of love. Match-making sites such as eHarmony, Match.com, OkCupid, and Casual Kiss are its love children.

    But is technology really a boon to romance or a barrier to intimacy?

    For the star-crossed lover Abelard who wrote to his unattainable Heloise nearly a thousand years ago, the agony of waiting for the mail to arrive must have been keen indeed. For many of today's romantically inclined, however, the immediacy of electronic love notes helps to keep intense relationships fresh.

    But for others, technology has its limits and its perils, because it allows us to reach out to, but not touch someone. Instead, we're substituting emoticons for emotions and stripping the intimacy of in-person encounters from the small daily kindnesses of personal relationships.

    "I think that word, 'connected' is a misnomer, because we believe we're connected but in many ways we might be more disconnected from the actual relationship with a person," says John O'Neill, LCSW, director of addictions services for the Menninger Clinic in Houston.

    A Match Made in (Cyber) Space

    Certainly, technology can bring people together. According to eHarmony.com, every day, 90 of its more than 17 million registered users get married. And there are as many match sites as there are fish in the sea.

    1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5
    Next Article:

    What physical changes do you experience when in love?