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    Marriage Pays Health Dividends -- for Him

    Commitment to lifelong relationship appears to be key, study says

    WebMD News from HealthDay

    By Randy Dotinga

    HealthDay Reporter

    WEDNESDAY, June 11, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- Guys, a loving spouse may save your life, U.S. health officials say. But living with a significant other doesn't appear to confer the same health benefits as marriage.

    Single and married men are more likely to see a doctor regularly than those living with a partner out of wedlock, according to a new U.S. National Center for Health Statistics (NCHS) study.

    And compared to husbands or other single men, cohabiting men are also the least likely to report having undergone preventive screenings such as cholesterol and blood pressure tests in the previous year, the researchers said.

    "Cohabiting men are a group particularly at risk of not receiving clinical preventive services recommended by the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force," according to the NCHS Data Brief published June 11 by the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

    The findings held true for younger and older males, the study authors noted.

    It's not clear why this is so. "That was completely unexpected, and I don't have an explanation for it," said study lead author Stephen Blumberg, an associate director with the NCHS division of health interview statistics.

    "But it does serve notice to the girlfriends and partners of these men that they could take a more active role in health care decisions and talk to them about getting healthy," Blumberg said.

    How intimate relationships affect men's health has been studied before. Plenty of research shows that people with spouses or committed partners -- especially men -- take better care of their health and have healthier lifestyles, said Timothy Smith, a professor of psychology at the University of Utah in Salt Lake City.

    The key seems to be the commitment to a lifelong relationship, said Linda Waite, a professor of urban sociology at the University of Chicago. Spouses look out for each other not just because of mutual affection but also because they're important to each other's futures, she said.

    Also, "people take better care of their own health because it's important to their partner," Waite said.

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