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Birth Control Health Center

Medical Reference Related to Birth Control

  1. Topic Overview

    Sexually transmitted diseases (STDs) are spread by sexual contact involving the genitals, mouth, or rectum, and can also be spread from a pregnant woman to her fetus before or during delivery. STDs, which affect both men and women, are a worldwide public health concern. While most STDs can be cured, some cannot, including HIV (which causes AIDS), genital herpes, and human papillomavirus (HPV), ...

  2. Topic Overview

    When to use a condomCondoms can be used with spermicide to prevent pregnancy or alone as protection against sexually transmitted diseases (STDs). Pregnancy prevention. Use a condom and spermicide to prevent pregnancy. Make sure to check the condom's expiration date, and do not use it if past that date.STD protection. To protect yourself and your partner from STD infection, use a condom during ...

  3. Other Birth Control Options

    WebMD provides a complete guide to birth control options, from the patch to the sponge to the rhythm method. Learn about how they work, their side effects and risks.

  4. Your Choices

    Some birth control methods work around the clock. Others work only when you use them, which means it's so very important to use them every time you have sex.Birth control methodsAbstinence. Not having sex (abstinence) is the most effective method of birth control and sexually transmitted infection (STI) protection.Barrier methods. The diaphragm, the cap, and male or female condoms are examples of barrier methods. They block the sperm from fertilizing an egg. You use one each time you have sex. And condoms also protect you from STIs. The pill, patch, or vaginal ring. These methods have hormones that stop you from releasing an egg each month (ovulation). You can choose to take a pill at the same time every day, change a patch every week, or change a ring every 3 weeks.Birth control shots. The shot contains hormones that prevent pregnancy for 3 months. You see your doctor every 3 months for the shot.Hormone implants. The implant, which is about the size of a matchstick, is put under

  5. Myth or Truth?

    A friend told me that you can't get pregnant if you haven't had a period at all, or even lately.Don't believe it! You make an egg, or ovulate, and then have a period. And ovulation can happen at any time. There's no day of the month when it's safe to have sex without birth control.I heard a guy say that having birth control means you'll say yes to sex at any time.Having protection against pregnancy and STIs means that it's there when you need it. But being prepared doesn't mean having to say yes unless you're comfortable with it.My sister told me you don't need birth control if you just douche after having sex.Flushing water into the vagina, or douching, after sex does not prevent pregnancy. I need to feel safe with my sex partner and with what we're doing together. It's got to be okay to say 'no' or 'stop' at any time. This should always be true. It's important that you be able to say no or stop at any time.I should be able to count on my partner to have a condom.Every time? Anyone

  6. Birth Control - Emergency Contraception

    You can use emergency contraception if a condom breaks, you've forgotten a pill, you are taking other medications that may affect contraception medications, or you have had unprotected sex. Emergency contraception does not protect against sexually transmitted diseases.There are two kinds of emergency contraception:Hormonal emergency contraception. Even though it is called the "morning - after ...

  7. Birth Control - Overview

    What is birth control?Birth control, also called contraception, is any method used to prevent pregnancy. It allows you to choose whether or when to have a child. Most women can become pregnant from the age when they start their menstrual periods until their late 40s or early 50s. During the many years before menopause, using birth control is key to avoiding an unplanned pregnancy. Which birth ...

  8. Topic Overview

    Birth control methods have high rates of effectiveness if they are used consistently. Follow your health professional's instructions on what to do if you miss or skip your birth control pills. Some general guidelines are listed here. Combination (estrogen plus progestin) birth control pills Always read the pill label for specific instructions. Or call your doctor. How likely pregnancy is ...

  9. Birth Control - Birth Control Methods

    There are many methods of birth control. Learn about the different kinds of birth control to help you choose the best one for you. When making your choice, also consider that only a condom will protect you from sexually transmitted diseases (STDs). To protect yourself and your partner against STDs, use a condom (along with your chosen birth control method) every time you have sex.Hormonal ...

  10. Birth Control - When to Call a Doctor

    Different birth control methods have different side effects and possible complications. It is important to understand the risks of the birth control method you use. Talk to your health professional if you have concerns about side effects.Call your health professional if you have symptoms of pregnancy, such as having missed one or more periods or having your period but with a lot less bleeding ...

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