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Birth Control Health Center

Medical Reference Related to Birth Control

  1. Birth Control - Emergency Contraception

    You can use emergency contraception if a condom breaks, you've forgotten a pill, you are taking other medications that may affect contraception medications, or you have had unprotected sex. Emergency contraception does not protect against sexually transmitted diseases.There are two kinds of emergency contraception:Hormonal emergency contraception. Even though it is called the "morning - after ...

  2. Birth Control - Choosing a Birth Control Method

    With so many methods available and so many factors to consider, choosing birth control can be difficult. You may be able to decide on a method by asking yourself the following questions. Might I want to have a biological child in the future?One of your first considerations might be to determine whether you want permanent or temporary birth control. In other words, you should consider whether you .

  3. Your Choices

    Some birth control methods work around the clock. Others work only when you use them, which means it's so very important to use them every time you have sex.Birth control methodsAbstinence. Not having sex (abstinence) is the most effective method of birth control and sexually transmitted infection (STI) protection.Barrier methods. The diaphragm, the cap, and male or female condoms are examples of barrier methods. They block the sperm from fertilizing an egg. You use one each time you have sex. And condoms also protect you from STIs. The pill, patch, or vaginal ring. These methods have hormones that stop you from releasing an egg each month (ovulation). You can choose to take a pill at the same time every day, change a patch every week, or change a ring every 3 weeks.Birth control shots. The shot contains hormones that prevent pregnancy for 3 months. You see your doctor every 3 months for the shot.Hormone implants. The implant, which is about the size of a matchstick, is put under

  4. Myth or Truth?

    A friend told me that you can't get pregnant if you haven't had a period at all, or even lately.Don't believe it! You make an egg, or ovulate, and then have a period. And ovulation can happen at any time. There's no day of the month when it's safe to have sex without birth control.I heard a guy say that having birth control means you'll say yes to sex at any time.Having protection against pregnancy and STIs means that it's there when you need it. But being prepared doesn't mean having to say yes unless you're comfortable with it.My sister told me you don't need birth control if you just douche after having sex.Flushing water into the vagina, or douching, after sex does not prevent pregnancy. I need to feel safe with my sex partner and with what we're doing together. It's got to be okay to say 'no' or 'stop' at any time. This should always be true. It's important that you be able to say no or stop at any time.I should be able to count on my partner to have a condom.Every time? Anyone

  5. How to Get Birth Control

    From a storeYou can buy birth control without going to a doctor. You can get male condoms in grocery stores, convenience stores, or drugstores. And you can get female condoms or a sponge and spermicide from a drugstore.You can buy emergency contraception without a prescription at most drugstores if you are 15 or older. From a doctorAt a doctor's office, you can get:A hormone shot. A hormone implant. An IUD. A fitted diaphragm or cervical cap.A prescription for hormone pills, patches, or rings. A prescription for emergency contraception, if you are younger than 15.From abstinenceWhen you use abstinence for preventing pregnancy:Know what you want and how you feel before things get sexual. Remember why you chose abstinence. Think about your reasons and why they are important to you. How you feel and what you believe matter.Think ahead. Try to avoid getting into situations where staying abstinent could be hard.Don't abuse alcohol or drugs. Alcohol and drugs can affect your decisions. They

  6. Overview

    Birth control methods have high rates of effectiveness if they are used consistently. Follow your health professional's instructions on what to do if you miss or skip your birth control pills. Some general guidelines are listed here. Combination (estrogen plus progestin) birth control pills Always read the pill label for specific instructions. Or call your doctor. How likely pregnancy is ...

  7. How to Decide

    Choosing birth control is a very personal thing. First, think through some basic facts about your birth control options. Then, focus in on what's important to you. And then, think about who you are and what your style is.How well does each birth control method protect me?Some methods depend on you and how well you use them—every time. These include hormone pills or the hormone patch or ring. The same is true for the condom, sponge, diaphragm, or cap. Some methods work very well for long periods of time without you having to do anything. These include the hormone implant or shot, and the IUD.Only a condom protects you from STIs. Abstinence depends on your commitment to not have sex. Not having vaginal intercourse prevents pregnancy. And not having oral sex, anal sex, or vaginal sex prevents STIs.Is it easy to keep with me?Some methods easily fit in your bag. These include hormone pills or a condom, sponge, diaphragm, or cap.Some methods don't have to be carried around at all. These

  8. Birth Control - Teens and Birth Control

    Whether you are male or female, your life can suddenly be changed forever by pregnancy or a sexually transmitted disease (STD). Think for a moment what this would be like for you. The most dependable way to prevent pregnancy and STD infection is not to have sexual intercourse. This is called abstinence. If you do not choose abstinence and are sexually active, always be prepared. To protect ...

  9. Intrauterine Device (IUD) for Birth Control

    The intrauterine device (IUD) is a long - term birth control method. Unlike IUDs that were used in the 1970s, present - day IUDs are small, safe, and highly effective.1An IUD is a small, T - shaped plastic device that is wrapped in copper or contains hormones. The IUD is inserted into your uterus by your health professional. A plastic string tied to the end of the IUD hangs down through the cervix

  10. Topic Overview

    The following tables list some pros and cons of using hormonal birth control methods. Combination pills,skin patch,or vaginal ring (estrogen plus progestin) Pros Cons No interruption of foreplay or intercourse Reduced bleeding and cramping with periods,which lowers the risk of anemia Fewer or no periods (with certain types of pill) Reduced pain during ovulation Reduced risk of pelvic ...

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