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Birth Control Health Center

Medical Reference Related to Birth Control

  1. Emergency Contraception FAQ

    Get answers to frequently asked questions about emergency contraception: What’s available? Do I need a prescription? How soon must I use it? Are there side effects or long-term effects?

  2. Emergency Contraception Questions for Your Doctor

    Which type of emergency contraception will work best for you, and other questions you may have for your doctor or pharmacist.

  3. How Does Emergency Contraception Work?

    If you need emergency contraception, you have a lot of reliable options, but you must act quickly. Learn more about your emergency contraception choices and how they work.

  4. Emergency Contraception: What to Expect

    What’s it like to use emergency contraception? Whether you choose pills or an IUD, you’re probably wondering about pain, nausea, and side effects. Here’s what you’re likely to feel.

  5. Topic Overview

    The intrauterine device (IUD) is a method of birth control that is placed in your uterus. It is a small, plastic, T-shaped device that contains copper or hormones. You can depend on an IUD to prevent pregnancy for 3 to 10 years, depending on the type. Your doctor will remove your IUD when it has reached its expiration date or if you have a medical problem. It's always your choice to have it removed sooner if you want to change birth control methods or plan to become pregnant. How is an IUD removed? An IUD removal normally takes just a few minutes. Most women find it is less painful or uncomfortable than having an IUD inserted. But ask your doctor if it's a good idea to take ibuprofen ahead of time in case of cramping. You will lie on the exam table on your back. Your feet will be in stirrups as they would be for a pelvic exam. Your doctor will insert a speculum into your vagina and look for the IUD strings. The strings usually come through the opening of your cervix. If they aren't

  6. Topic Overview

    The following tables list some pros and cons of using hormonal birth control methods. Combination pills,skin patch,or vaginal ring (estrogen plus progestin) Pros Cons No interruption of foreplay or intercourse Reduced bleeding and cramping with periods,which lowers the risk of anemia Fewer or no periods (with certain types of pill) Reduced pain during ovulation Reduced risk of pelvic ...

  7. Intrauterine Device (IUD) for Birth Control

    The intrauterine device (IUD) is a long - term birth control method. Unlike IUDs that were used in the 1970s, present - day IUDs are small, safe, and highly effective.1An IUD is a small, T - shaped plastic device that is wrapped in copper or contains hormones. The IUD is inserted into your uterus by your health professional. A plastic string tied to the end of the IUD hangs down through the cervix

  8. Birth Control Implants

    WebMD explains the types and safety of birth control implants.

  9. Tubal Ligation and Tubal Implants

    Tubal ligation, often referred to as "having your tubes tied, " is a surgical procedure in which a woman's fallopian tubes are blocked, tied, or cut.

  10. Birth Control and the Cervical Cap

    WebMD offers useful information about the cervical cap, a method of birth control.

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