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    Sexual Health Center

    Medical Reference Related to Sexual Health

    1. Gynecological Exam for Genital Warts (Human Papillomavirus)

      A gynecological exam for genital warts includes:Visual exam of the vulva.Speculum exam.Bimanual pelvic exam.Rectal exam.Rectovaginal exam.The visual exam and the speculum exam are the most important for diagnosing genital warts.Some health professionals may use an acetowhite test to make the warts more visible. A vinegar solution (weak acetic acid) may be applied to the skin to show the ...

    2. Syphilis - Topic Overview

      Syphilis is a sexually transmitted disease (STD) or sexually transmitted infection (STI) that, when left untreated, can progress to a late stage that causes serious health problems.

    3. Bacterial Vaginosis - Home Treatment

      There is no home treatment for trichomoniasis (trich), but you can reduce your risk factors.

    4. Genital Herpes - Home Treatment

      Home treatment for genital herpes focuses on relieving symptoms, reducing the risk of recurrent outbreaks, and helping you cope with a lifelong condition.

    5. Genital Herpes - What Increases Your Risk

      Factors that increase your risk of getting genital herpes include having multiple sex partners having high-risk partner(s), and having unprotected sexual contact (not using condoms).

    6. Chlamydia - Exams and Tests

      Learn about exams and tests for syphilis.

    7. Gonorrhea - What Increases Your Risk

      Read about risk factors for syphilis.

    8. HIV: Giving Support - Topic Overview

      Getting tested for HIV can be scary,but the condition is treatable. So it is important to get tested if you think you have been exposed. Early detection and monitoring of HIV will help your doctor find out whether the disease is getting worse and when to start treatment. The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) recommends that everyone should get tested for HIV as part of ...

    9. Contraceptive Sponge for Birth Control - Topic Overview

      The intrauterine device (IUD) is a method of birth control that is placed in your uterus. It is a small, plastic, T-shaped device that contains copper or hormones. You can depend on an IUD to prevent pregnancy for 3 to 10 years, depending on the type. Your doctor will remove your IUD when it has reached its expiration date or if you have a medical problem. It's always your choice to have it removed sooner if you want to change birth control methods or plan to become pregnant. How is an IUD removed? An IUD removal normally takes just a few minutes. Most women find it is less painful or uncomfortable than having an IUD inserted. But ask your doctor if it's a good idea to take ibuprofen ahead of time in case of cramping. You will lie on the exam table on your back. Your feet will be in stirrups as they would be for a pelvic exam. Your doctor will insert a speculum into your vagina and look for the IUD strings. The strings usually come through the opening of your cervix. If they aren't

    10. Gonorrhea - Cause

      Learn about the causes of syphilils.

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