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Genital Warts and HPV

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Warts are caused by viruses and can appear anywhere on the body. Those that show up in the genital area are caused by the human papillomavirus, commonly called HPV, and are easily transmitted by sexual contact.

HPV infection is the most common sexually transmitted disease (STD) in North America. Certain forms of the virus can cause cervical, rectal, vulvar, vaginal, and penile cancer. According to the CDC, at least 50% of sexually active men and women will get a genital HPV infection at some point in their lives.

Recommended Related to HPV/Genital Warts

Oral HPV and Cancer

Scientists have known for decades about the link between the human papillomavirus (HPV) and cervical cancer. But only in the last few years have they learned that an oral infection with the virus can also cause cancers of the head and neck. Most people who get oral HPV don’t get cancer. Your body usually fights the virus before you even know you have it. But head and neck cancers are on the rise, and scientists say oral HPV may be the cause. The good news? You can take basic steps to prevent infection...

Read the Oral HPV and Cancer article > >

After a person has been infected by HPV, it may take one to three months (or longer in some cases) for warts to appear. Some people who have been infected never get warts.

What Do Genital Warts Look Like?

Genital warts look like small flesh-colored, pink or red growths in or around the sex organs. The warts may look similar to the small parts of a cauliflower or they may be very tiny and difficult to see. They often appear in clusters of three or four, and may grow and spread rapidly. They usually are not painful, although they may cause mild pain, bleeding, and itching.

Genital Wart Symptoms

Like many STDs, HPV does not always have visible symptoms. But when symptoms do occur, warts may be seen around the genital area. In women, warts can develop on the outside and inside of the vagina, on the cervix (the opening to the uterus), or around the anus. In men, they may be seen on the tip of the penis, the shaft of the penis, on the scrotum, or around the anus. Genital warts also can develop in the mouth or throat of a person who has had oral sex with an infected person.

Because there is no way to predict whether the warts will grow or disappear, people who have been infected should be examined and treated, if necessary.

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