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HPV-Linked Throat Cancer May Have Telltale Signs

Signs of potential trouble could be different in people without the virus, study suggests
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WebMD News from HealthDay

By Amy Norton

HealthDay Reporter

THURSDAY, March 20, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- The first symptoms of throat and mouth cancer -- also known as oropharyngeal cancer -- may differ depending on whether the condition is caused by the human papillomavirus (HPV), a small study suggests.

Oropharyngeal cancer arises in the throat, soft palate, tonsils or base of the tongue. Smoking is a major risk factor, as is chronic infection with certain strains of HPV -- which causes warts in the genitals, mouth and anus, and is the most common sexually transmitted disease in the United States.

Although oropharyngeal cancer is relatively uncommon, the rate of HPV-linked cases has been rising -- particularly among white adults younger than 55. The reasons aren't clear, but experts suspect that changes in oral sex practices have a lot to do with it.

The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention estimates that each year about 8,400 Americans are diagnosed with HPV-related oropharyngeal cancer.

"We're seeing this in younger, healthy people who don't smoke," said Dr. Terry Day, senior researcher on the new study and a specialist in head and neck cancers at the Medical University of South Carolina, in Charleston.

Despite the concerning rise in oropharyngeal cancers, Day said, there has been a lack of research into the initial symptoms -- including whether the signs of HPV-linked tumors are distinct.

So his team looked at records for 88 patients diagnosed with oropharyngeal cancer at their center between 2008 and 2013. Most -- 71 -- had HPV-positive cancer, and for them the most common first symptom was a lump in the neck.

Half of those patients had a "mass" in the neck, versus only 18 percent of patients with HPV-negative cancer, Day's team reported in the March 20 online issue of JAMA Otolaryngology--Head & Neck Surgery.

For the patients without HPV infection, a persistent sore throat and difficulty swallowing were the most common first signs. More than half complained of a sore throat, while 41 percent had problems with swallowing.

Some patients with HPV-linked cancer had those symptoms, too, but less commonly: 28 percent had a stubborn sore throat, and only 10 percent had trouble swallowing, the findings showed.

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