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Acne Health Center

Acne During Pregnancy

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Acne is common during pregnancy. In fact, more than one out of every two pregnant women can expect to develop acne. In some cases, the acne may be severe.

The primary cause of acne when you're pregnant is the increased hormone levels in the first trimester. The higher level increases the skin's production of natural oils. It's hard to predict who will develop pregnancy acne. You have a higher risk, though, if you have a history of acne or have acne flares at the start of your menstrual cycle. If you do not develop acne during the first trimester, it's unlikely you'll have breakouts that are out of the ordinary during the second or third trimesters.

Managing acne when you're pregnant can be tricky. That's because many prescription and over-the-counter treatments come with a high risk of birth defects. In general, you should avoid any medication you don't absolutely need when you're pregnant that has even a remote chance of harming your baby.

Here is information about pregnancy acne that can help keep you and your unborn baby safe.

Dealing With Acne During Pregnancy

Pregnancy acne is a natural, cosmetic condition. It usually subsides when hormone levels return to normal. So the safest thing to do is to avoid any prescription acne medications or over-the-counter chemical spot treatments. Instead, you can rely on drug-free home remedies. But before starting any acne treatment when you're pregnant or planning to become pregnant, talk with your doctor about what's best -- and safest -- for you.

Unsafe Treatments for Pregnancy Acne

Isotretinoin is an oral medication that has revolutionized the way severe acne is treated. However, it's especially dangerous when you are pregnant. That's because the drug can affect a fetus and cause serious birth defects.

Any patient who takes isotretinoin, as well as any doctor who prescribes it, pharmacy that dispenses it, and wholesaler who distributes it, must enroll in a special program that's part of a risk-management program to prevent pregnancy and birth defects.

Because the risks are so high, women of childbearing age who take the drug need to be on two forms of birth control starting at least one month before they begin therapy. They also need to stay on two forms of birth control for at least one month after therapy ends. Also, women must have pregnancy tests before, during, and after treatment.

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