Skip to content

    Acne Health Center

    Font Size
    A
    A
    A

    A Guide to Treating Mild Acne

    By
    WebMD Feature

    The first signs of mild acne could be the appearance of a few red bumps around your mouth or chin. Perhaps you're going through a stressful period at work or have other demands knocking at your door. This can't be acne, you think. Acne is what teenagers get.

    There's a lingering myth that acne only affects the teenage crowd. In fact, acne is the most common skin condition in the country, affecting an estimated 40 to 50 million Americans, and can cause anxiety and stress regardless of severity.

    Recommended Related to Acne

    Conquer Complexion Imperfections

    By Beth Janes Looking younger may hinge less on a lineless complexion and more on a clear one: Research shows that uneven skin tone can add about a decade to your perceived age. So while you've been heaping attention — and night creams — on wrinkles to turn back the clock, other factors like age spots, redness, enlarged pores, and adult acne might be putting those years back on. The bright side: Uneven skin tone is easier to correct (or at least conceal) than wrinkles, and it's often treated with...

    Read the Conquer Complexion Imperfections article > >

    Understanding acne and comparing acne treatment options can help you tackle the problem head-on and find a workable solution. While acne, commonly called acne vulgaris or acne rosacea, is not curable, it is treatable. Mild acne can be properly managed with the help of your dermatologist or doctor.

    "A lot of patients are surprised to discover they have adult acne," says John E. Wolf Jr., MD, professor and chairman of the department of dermatology at Baylor College of Medicine in Houston. "The big myth is that acne is a childhood and teenage disease. Acne can be seen literally cradle to grave."

    The Signs of Mild Acne

    What does acne look like? The symptoms of adult acne can look vastly different than teenage acne. Take location, for instance. Instead of tiny bumps in the T-Zone, acne may be more likely to appear in the lower part of the face, especially around the mouth, jaw and neck.

    Acne spots often appear in areas with the highest concentration of sebaceous glands, for example, the face, neck, upper back, and chest. Basically, pores become blocked, causing pimples, called papules and pustules, to form. Whiteheads (completely blocked pores) and blackheads (partially blocked pores) can trap a combination of oil, bacteria, and dead skin cells.

    There may be itching, pigmentation, or dry skin associated with adult acne, says Patricia Farris, MD, a dermatologist in private practice in Metairie, La., and clinical associate professor in the department of dermatology at Tulane University School of Medicine in New Orleans.

    There are a number of factors contributing to acne. For women, hormonal changes such as pregnancy and menopause can lead to breakouts. Stress may be a contributing factor, and acne can be triggered or aggravated by external factors, such as clothing or medications.

    1 | 2 | 3

    Today on WebMD

    Girl with acne
    See if you know how to control your acne.
    happy woman with clear skin
    Triggers and treatments for blackheads, whiteheads, and cystic acne.
     
    Bride with acne
    Dos and don’ts for hiding breakouts.
    close-up of a young man soaping his face
    Why adults get acne and how to treat it.
     
    Doctors
    Article
    Boy cleaning acne face
    Quiz
     
    HPV Vaccine Future
    Video
    beauty cream
    Article
     
    Bride with acne
    Slideshow
    Woman applying mineral makeup
    Slideshow
     
    69x75_mineral_makeup.jpg
    Video
    Arrows pointing on teen girl blemish
    Quiz
     

    WebMD Special Sections