Skip to content
My WebMD Sign In, Sign Up

Acne Health Center

Font Size
A
A
A

Pediatricians Endorse New Acne Treatment Guidelines

Experts note many medications now available for range of cases

continued...

The drug is very effective, but it can cause birth defects, so girls and women have to use birth control and get regular pregnancy tests if they go on the medication. Isotretinoin also has been linked to inflammatory bowel disease, depression and suicidal thoughts in some users -- although it's not clear the drug is to blame, the AAP said. (Severe acne itself can cause depression and suicidal thoughts, for example.)

Dr. David Pariser, a dermatologist not involved in the recommendations, said they are "based on sound evidence" and reflect the "best practices" in battling acne.

When should parents consider taking their child to a doctor for acne treatment? It depends on how severe the problem is, and how bothered the child is, said Pariser, who sits on the board of directors of the American Academy of Dermatology.

Some kids can deal with skin eruptions, but Pariser said he sees others who refuse to leave the house.

Both he and Eichenfield said it's important to dispel kids' (and sometimes parents') acne myths. "Acne is not caused by dirt or poor hygiene," Eichenfield said, and harshly scrubbing your face will probably make the situation worse.

It's best to wash your face gently twice a day, with a soap-free pH-balanced cleanser, the AAP said. Facial toners -- which commonly come in pre-packaged acne regimens -- can help clear away oil. But the group suggested going easy on toners, since they can irritate the skin.

And what about food? "The medical community has swung back and forth on that over the years," Pariser said. Years ago, people thought that certain foods, like chocolate, sugar and iodine, promoted breakouts, but studies starting in the late 1960s failed to confirm that.

"The idea that food plays a role became relegated to myth," Eichenfield said. But recently, he added, some researchers have been revisiting the issue. There is some evidence that a sugary diet may promote acne, for example. But for now, it's not clear whether any diet changes will actually help keep kids' skin clear, Eichenfield said.

The bottom line, he said, is that many treatment options are available. "There's no reason that children have to live with acne that is severe and troubling to them," he said.

1 | 2

Today on WebMD

Woman with acne
Slideshow
Close-up of acne
Slideshow
 
boy with pimple
Article
Adult Acne
Q&A
 
Doctors
Article
Boy cleaning acne face
Quiz
 
HPV Vaccine Future
Video
beauty cream
Article
 
Bride with acne
Slideshow
Woman applying mineral makeup
Slideshow
 
69x75_mineral_makeup.jpg
Video
Arrows pointing on teen girl blemish
Quiz
 

WebMD Special Sections