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    Face Transplants Face Reality

    Experts are wary as some surgeons seek to attempt a face transplant -- a procedure that probably isn't what you think it is.
    By
    WebMD Feature

    Face transplants soon will be a reality. But they aren't what you think they are.

    In the movies, a character goes to the doctor and emerges the next day with someone else's face. This leads to complications. Real-life face transplants won't be anything like this. And the real-life risks may be far more serious, says Steven J. Pearlman, MD, president-elect of the American Academy of Facial, Plastic, and Reconstructive Surgery.

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    "This is nothing at all like the illusion -- or delusion -- of swapping a face with someone else's," Pearlman tells WebMD. "It will never be a cosmetic procedure. The operation itself is a potentially fatal procedure because of the risk of rejection, life-long immune suppression, and the potential for life-threatening infections even if there is no graft rejection."

    Face Transplant: The Reality

    Face transplants would work much like other organ transplants. The family of a deceased person would donate that person's face to a needy patient. But after the transplant, the recipient would not look like the donor.

    Why? The transplanted material would be a kind of a soft mask made of skin and soft tissue. Its final shape would depend on the bone structure of the recipient. That means that the person who got the transplant would have a brand-new face. It would not look like the face of the donor. It would not look like the recipient's old face, either.

    "The recipient will not look like the donor or like themselves," Pearlman says. "We are not transplanting the underlying skeleton. So there will be no resemblance whatever. They will look more like someone with reconstruction of a severe burn or devastating cancer. These are people who are not going to be that visibly attractive. Like when a toe is used to replace the thumb. It is not a terribly attractive digit, but it works."

    The new face would look better than the skin grafts now used to heal the wounds of people who suffer devastating facial burns or traumas -- if all went well. But there would still be big scars. The new face would not move like a person's original face, says Ira D. Papel, MD, an officer of the American Board of Facial, Plastic, and Reconstructive Surgery Inc. and associate professor at Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine.

    "We have a long way to go," Papel says. "It is not just appearance but function: motion, integrating the movement of the skin with movement of the nose, mouth, and eyes. All the senses will be affected - and we have no way of hooking up nerves in a reliable fashion. To try to get normal facial function, it is a wish at this point. Maybe someday it will all be possible. But not yet."

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