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Skin Problems & Treatments Health Center

Getting Stitches (Sutures)

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The Procedure continued...

Once the area is numb, the doctor will take a closer look to make sure there’s no dirt, debris, or other foreign objects inside the cut before sewing it together. An X-ray may also be ordered to help look for remaining debris. If you cut yourself on a piece of glass or sharp metal, for instance, it’s crucial to ensure that there are no remaining shards inside the cut.

The doctor may remove any dead tissues to help the healing process. He or she will then pull the edges of the cut together and, for each stitch, loop thread through either side of the cut and tie a knot to hold the wound closed.

Doctors can use different types of surgical thread made from materials such as silk or nylon, which may be in single filaments or braided. There's even surgical thread that is designed to dissolve over time so that the stitches don’t need to be removed. These are used most frequently in deep cuts.

Caring for Stitches

The doctor or nurse will give you instructions for caring for your stitches as your cut heals. These may include specific steps for cleaning and dressing the wound. You may be advised to keep the wound and bandages dry.

Your doctor may also recommend an antibiotic ointment to help prevent infection and make you aware of signs that may indicate infection. Keep an eye out for such signs, including a fever higher than 100 degrees or red streaks on the skin near the wound. And if any of your stitches pop or break, or you have any other concerns, be sure to contact your doctor.

Removal of Stitches

Stitches typically need to remain in place for several days to a couple of weeks, depending on the severity of the cut and location. Your doctor will tell you when to come back to have them taken out. Removing stitches is a much faster process than putting them in. The doctor simply clips each thread near the knot and pulls them out. You may feel a slight tugging sensation, but the removal of stitches shouldn't hurt at all. You won't even need an anesthetic.

Although removing stitches is not a difficult process, you shouldn't try to remove them yourself. It's important for your doctor to check to see that the wound is healing properly and to make sure that it's OK for the stitches to come out. The doctor may also have special instructions for you after the stitches are removed, which may help minimize scarring.

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