Skip to content

Skin Problems & Treatments Health Center

Medical Reference Related to Skin Problems & Treatments

  1. Impetigo

    Impetigo: S. aureus. Crusted erythematous erosions becoming confluent on the nose, cheek, lips, and chin in a child with nasal carriage of S. aureus and mild facial eczema.

  2. Lymphedema

    Lymphedema. Post-surgical swelling of the right arm compared to the left arm.

  3. Gingival Hyperplasia from Phenytoin

    Gingival hyperplasia from phenytoin. The mechanisms of adverse reactions to drugs vary. Some, like the urticarial or eczematous, are clearly based on an allergic or immunologic mechanism; others are utterly obscure in mechanism. Such is the gingival hyperplasia caused by phenytoin. Since it occurs in almost all patients receiving the drug, all one can say is that the effect probably is within the normal pharmacologic action of the drug.

  4. Klippel-Trénaunay-Weber Syndrome

    Klippel-Trénaunay-Weber syndrome. This is a condition in which vascular malformations, varicosities, and phlebectasia cover an entire limb or other body area. There may be associated skeletal abnormalities including macrodactyly and syndactyly. A combination of port-wine stain and vascular malformations may be present from birth. The osteohypertrophy develops during the first several years of life.

  5. Lyme Disease

    Lyme disease is a bacterial infection transmitted by a tick Lyme disease was first recognized in 1975 after researchers investigated why unusually large numbers of children were being diagnosed with juvenile rheumatoid arthritis in Lyme, Connecticut and two neighboring towns.

  6. Lentigo

    Lentigo on left cheek of a female.

  7. Lentigines

    Lentigines. Scattered brown macular spots on the back of a child with multiple lentigines (LEOPARD) syndrome.

  8. Jaundice

    Often, physiologic jaundice -- the type seen in most newborns -- does not require treatment. It will typically disappear in a few days.

  9. Iododerma and Bromoderma Granulomatous Reaction

    Granulomatous reaction caused by a bromide. Another baleful characteristic of drug eruptions from halides is persistence and extension of reaction once it occurs. The reason for such persistence or extension, even when a known source of the offending drug is removed, is the wide dispersion of occult iodine or bromine salts in foods, in the environment, and indeed in the body’s own chemistry. Iodine, for example, is a constituent of thyroid hormone.

  10. Hand-Foot-and-Mouth Disease on Hand

    Hand-foot-and-mouth disease. Multiple, discrete, small, vesicular lesions on the fingers and palms; similar lesions were also present on the feet. Some vesicles are typically linear.

Displaying 101 - 110 of 1035 Articles << Prev Page 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 Next >>

Today on WebMD

chafing
Pictures and symptoms of the red, scaly rash.
woman with dyed dark hair
What it says about your health.
 
woman with cleaning products
Top causes of the itch that rashes.
atopic dermatitus
Identify and treat common skin problems.
 
itchy skin
Article
shingles rash on skin
Article
 
woman with skin tag
Quiz
Woman washing face
Video
 

Itching for Relief?

Get Help With the

Loading ...

Sending your email...

This feature is temporarily unavailable. Please try again later.

Thanks!

Now check your email account on your mobile phone to download your new app.

woman washing her hair in sink
Video
close up of womans bare neck
Tools
 
Feet
Slideshow
woman with face cream
Quiz