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    Skin Problems & Treatments Health Center

    Medical Reference Related to Skin Problems & Treatments

    1. Erythema Nodosum

      Erythema nodosum. Red, tender, subcutaneous nodules on the extensor aspects of the legs between knees and ankles are a common condition of many causes, some clear, some likely, and many obscure. The most important conditions that are heralded or attended by erythema nodosum are such infections as streptococcal upper-respiratory infections, ulcerative colitis, histoplasmosis, coccidioidomycosis, tuberculosis, syphilis, and leprosy. Another condition that is sometimes revealed by investigation of erythema nodosum is sarcoidosis. Drugs, including oral contraceptives, appear to be the cause of particular cases of erythema nodosum. In many cases, however, no clear cause can be found.

    2. Dysplastic Nevi (Atypical Moles)

      Dysplastic nevi are moles that are larger than average (larger than a pencil eraser) and irregular in shape. They tend to have uneven color with dark brown centers and lighter, uneven edges.

    3. Dysplastic Nevi (Atypical Moles) Close-Up

      Dysplastic nevi are moles that are larger than average (larger than a pencil eraser) and irregular in shape. They tend to have uneven color with dark brown centers and lighter, uneven edges.

    4. Fire Ant Bites

      A fire ant attaches to a person by biting with its jaws. Then, pivoting its head, it stings from its belly in a circular pattern at multiple sites.

    5. Erythema Infectiosum

      Erythema infectiosum (fifth disease). Erythema infectiosum is a mild childhood disease that is caused by human parvovirus B19. This condition develops after a mean incubation period of 14 days. There are few if any prodromal symptoms. The rash evolves in three clinical stages. The first stage is characterized by the abrupt appearance of a bright-red malar blush. The appearance is so startling that it has been given the suggestive description of “slapped cheeks”. During the second stage, the facial rash begins to fade, and a maculopapular, urticarial, or morbilliform exanthem develops on the extremities and trunk. Pruritus may be present.

    6. Herpes Zoster

      Herpes zoster. Grouped vesicles on an erythematous base in a dermatomal distribution on the hip of an infant.

    7. Infectious Mononucleosis

      Infectious mononucleosis. Marked white exudate on the tonsils of a child with infectious mononucleosis.

    8. Does Ringworm Mean I Have Worms?

      Worms don't cause ringworm. Rather, this superficial skin infection, also known as tinea, is caused by fungi called dermatophytes.

    9. Fire Ant Stings

      Fire ant stings. Erythematous macules with central pustule formation 24 hours after bites in the same child.

    10. Lichen Simplex Chronicus

      Lichen simplex chronicus. Hyperpigmented, lichenified plaque with accentuated skin lined caused by repeated rubbing of the area. Lichen simplex chronicus (LSC) is a localized, well-circumscribed area of lichenification (thickened skin) resulting from repeated rubbing, itching, and scratching of the skin. It can occur on normal skin of individuals with atopic, seborrheic, contact dermatitis, or psoriasis.

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