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Drug-Resistant Staph May Get Nastier

Experts Call for Increased Efforts to Halt MRSA

Fighting MRSA

Scandinavian nations, which don't yet have a large MRSA problem, are making a major effort to keep it out of their hospitals. They're screening new patients, and isolating any carriers they find.

Gould argues that MRSA efforts should be taken into communities. He urges tracing the contacts of infected people, wiping out MRSA even in people with no symptoms of infection, and decontaminating the households of MRSA carriers.

Grundmann and colleagues, too, urge action. They worry that if community MRSA isn't stopped outside hospital doors, it will cause dangerous infections not only in ill patients, but also in relatively healthy patients and health care workers.

And they worry that MRSA will become even more virulent. After all, they note, the devastating 80/81 bug of the 1950s is closely related to the Southwest Pacific clone of MRSA.

What can you do? Here's the CDC's advice on how to fight MRSA:

  • If you have an infected wound or pus-filled boil, see your doctor.
  • Carefully follow your doctor's advice on how to care for your wound.
  • Cover skin infections -- especially those with pus -- with clean, dry bandages. Pus from skin infections and infected wounds spread staph to other people.
  • If you have a skin infection or infected wound, tell your family and other close contacts to wash their hands often with soap and warm water. Remember to wash properly: Scrub your hands and fingers while saying the alphabet slowly. Don't stop until you get to Z.
  • Don't share personal items -- including towels, washcloths, razors, or clothing -- that may have come into contact with an infection. Wash contaminated bed linens, towels, and clothing in hot water and laundry detergent. Dry these items in a hot dryer, not on the clothesline.
  • If you have MRSA, tell any doctor who treats you that you have an antibiotic-resistant infection.
  • If your doctor gives you antibiotics for a skin infection, be alert for signs of treatment failure. If you get any new boils, sores, or new infections, call your doctor. If your fever gets worse -- or if you get a new fever -- call your doctor. If your infection doesn't look a little better after three or four days, call your doctor. Remember to take all your medicine as prescribed, even if you seem to be better.

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