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How to Treat Your Psoriasis

Although you can’t cure psoriasis, there are ways to ease its symptoms, and you don't have just one or two options. There are many ways to treat it. You can even combine some of them. So if one thing doesn't work, something else likely will.

You and your doctor will decide on a treatment plan based on:

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  • How severe your psoriasis is
  • What treatments you've already used
  • Whether you have other medical conditions
  • How much you’re willing to do

Making Your Plan

Your doctor will probably first suggest that you try a preparation you apply to your skin. Topical medications include creams, ointments, shampoos, foams, and oils. You’ll probably need a prescription, but some products are available over the counter.

The most common ones use corticosteroids to calm inflammation. Others use salicylic acid to help remove scales.

Other options you might try include:

  • Formulas with vitamin D, including calipotriene ( Dovonex, Sorilux) and calcitriol (Rocaltrol. Vectical)
  • Retinoids like tazarotene (Tazorac)
  • Tar treatments such as Pentrax, Polytar, Balnetar, and Tera-Gel

If your psoriasis covers more than 10% to 20% of your skin, you’ll probably need more than these treatments alone. Your doctor may recommend:

Light therapy (phototherapy). Exposing your skin to the sun or other ultraviolet light can improve your symptoms. You do this at a doctor's office or with a phototherapy unit at home. Newer techniques use a laser, which can target a small area with a highly focused UVB light.

Pills. For psoriasis that doesn't respond to other treatments, drugs like acitretin ( Soriatane), apremilast (Otezla), cyclosporine, and methotrexate (Trexall) may help. They're usually reserved for moderate to severe psoriasis because the side effects can be harsh. Your doctor will need to keep a close watch on you.

“Biologic” drugs. These may improve psoriasis if other drugs don’t help enough. They seem to have fewer side effects than some other medications, too. Most of them work by suppressing your immune system, so serious infections and even cancer are risks, though rare ones. Biologics used to treat psoriasis include adalimumab (Humira), etanercept ( Enbrel), infliximab ( Remicade), secukinumab (Cosentyx), and ustekinumab (Stelara).

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