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    Skin Problems & Treatments Health Center

    Calluses and Corns - Topic Overview

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    How are calluses and corns diagnosed?

    Your doctor will look at the calluses or corns that are causing problems for you. He or she may also ask you questions about your work, your hobbies, or the types of shoes you wear. An X-ray of the foot may be done if your doctor suspects a problem with the bones.

    How are they treated?

    Calluses and corns do not need treatment unless they cause pain. If they do cause pain, you can ease the pain by:

    • Wearing shoes that fit well and are roomy, with wide and deep toe boxes (the area that surrounds the toes).
      • A wider toe box keeps the toes from pressing against each other, relieving pressure on soft corns.
      • A deeper toe box keeps the toes from pressing against the top of the shoe, relieving pressure on hard corns.
    • Using protective padding while your foot heals, such as:

    Other things you can try include:

    • Reducing the size of the callus or corn by soaking your callus or corn in warm water and then using a pumice stone to lightly wear away the dead skin. Never cut the corn or callus yourself, especially if you have diabetes or other conditions that cause circulatory problems or numbness.
    • Using salicylic acid to soften the callus or corn. You can then rub the callus or corn off with a pumice stone. Some doctors advise against using salicylic acid because it can damage surrounding skin. If you use salicylic acid, be sure to apply it only to the callus or corn and not to the surrounding skin. And never use salicylic acid if you have diabetes or other conditions that cause circulatory problems or numbness.
    • Having your doctor pare (trim) the callus or corn with a small knife. Your doctor can do this in his or her office.

    If you keep having problems with calluses or corns, or your problem is severe, your doctor may have you see a foot specialist (a podiatrist). You may be fitted for orthotic inserts or metatarsal bar inserts for your shoes to distribute your weight more evenly over the ball of your foot. Athletes who run a lot may wear orthotic shoe inserts for the same purpose.

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    WebMD Medical Reference from Healthwise

    Last Updated: March 26, 2014
    This information is not intended to replace the advice of a doctor. Healthwise disclaims any liability for the decisions you make based on this information.
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