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6. Keep your hands off your face. Avoid touching your face or propping your cheek or chin on your hands. Not only can you spread bacteria, you can also irritate the already inflamed facial skin. Never pick or pop pimples with your fingers, as it can lead to infection and scarring.

7. Stay out of the sun. The sun's ultraviolet rays can increase inflammation and redness. Some acne medications may make your skin more sensitive to sunlight. Limit your time in the sun, especially between the hours of 10 a.m. and 2 p.m., and wear protective clothing, such as a long-sleeved shirt, pants, and a broad-brimmed hat. Whether you have pimples or not, always apply sunscreen with SPF 30 or higher at least 20 minutes before sun exposure. Look for "noncomedogenic" on the sunscreen label to make new pimples less likely. Read the ingredients on the product label to know what you're putting on your skin.

8. Feed your skin. Most experts agree that certain foods, like chocolate, don't cause pimples. Still, it makes sense to avoid greasy food and junk food and add more fresh fruits and vegetables and whole grains to your diet.

9. Exercise daily. Regular exercise is good for your whole body, including your skin. When you exercise, avoid wearing clothing or using exercise equipment that rubs your skin and may cause irritation. Shower or bathe right after exercise.

10. Chill! Some studies link stress with the severity of pimples or acne. Ask yourself what's making you feel stressed. Then look for solutions.

When in doubt, check with a dermatologist to see if you need more treatment to prevent or stop acne.