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News Related to Sleep Disorders

  1. Work Steals Valuable Sleep Time, Study Finds

    By Kathleen Doheny HealthDay Reporter TUESDAY, Dec. 16, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- Chronic sleep loss is rampant in America, and work commitment is a big reason why, new research suggests. "Work is the No. 1 sleep killer," said Dr. Mathias Basner, an assistant professor of sleep and chronobiology in p

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  2. Smoking and Efforts to Quit Problem Drinking

    By Robert Preidt HealthDay Reporter FRIDAY, Dec. 12, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- Smoking might hamper treatment for alcohol abuse, a new study indicates. "The data suggest that smoking is associated with difficulties in alcohol treatment. Tobacco smokers had shorter treatment durations and were less li

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  3. Sleep Apnea May Raise Risk for Dementia

    By Amy Norton HealthDay Reporter WEDNESDAY, Dec. 10, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- Older men who have breathing difficulties or spend less time in deep sleep may be at greater risk of brain changes that can precede dementia, a new study suggests. Experts said the findings don't prove that breathing disor

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  4. Sleeping Well May Depend on Your Genes, Study Says

    By Randy Dotinga HealthDay Reporter WEDNESDAY, Dec. 3, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- How much sleep you get each night may depend to some extent on your genes, a new study suggests. "Sleep patterns are influenced by genetic differences," said study co-author Dr. Daniel Gottlieb, a sleep researcher and as

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  5. Sleep Apnea May Lower Your Aerobic Fitness

    By Robert Preidt HealthDay Reporter WEDNESDAY, Dec. 3, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- People with sleep apnea may have lower levels of aerobic fitness, a new study suggests. Sleep apnea causes the upper airway to become blocked by soft tissue in the back of the throat during sleep. This causes pauses in b

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  6. Sleep Apnea May Steal Some of Your Memory

    By Robert Preidt HealthDay Reporter FRIDAY, Oct. 31, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- Sleep apnea may make it hard for you to remember simple things, such as where you parked your car or left your house keys, a small study suggests. Tests on 18 people with severe sleep apnea showed that this ability -- call

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  7. Could a 'Fat Tongue' Be a Factor in Sleep Apnea?

    By Robert Preidt HealthDay Reporter TUESDAY, Sept. 30, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- Sleep apnea is a potential health risk for millions of Americans, and a new study points to a possible culprit behind the disorder: a "fat" tongue. "This is the first study to show that fat deposits are increased in the

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  8. Poor-Quality Sleep May Be Linked to Shrinking Brain

    By Tara Haelle HealthDay Reporter WEDNESDAY, Sept. 3, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- Not getting a good night's sleep might be linked to shrinkage of the brain's gray matter over time, new research suggests. Faster deterioration of three parts of the brain was seen in mostly older adults who had poor slee

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  9. 'Sleep Drunkenness' Is Common and Linked to Other Behavior Issues

    By Steven Reinberg HealthDay Reporter MONDAY, Aug. 25, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- "Sleep drunkenness" is more common than previously thought, affecting about one in seven Americans, or 15 percent, according to a new study that looked at the sleeping habits of more than 19,000 adults. Also called confu

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  10. FDA Approves New Kind of Insomnia Drug

    By Robert Preidt HealthDay Reporter WEDNESDAY, Aug. 13, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- A new prescription insomnia drug that's the first of its kind was approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration on Wednesday. Belsomra (suvorexant) tablets are approved to treat patients with insomnia, which means t

    Read Full Article
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You say you are able to function well with fewer than seven hours of sleep. Some people say they can function on four to six hours of sleep each night, but research shows that adults who get fewer than seven hours of sleep — whether for just one night or over the course of days, weeks, or months — have more difficulty concentrating and more mood problems than people who sleep seven to nine hours.

Since you usually get too little sleep, please talk to your doctor about your sleep patterns. Poor quality sleep can affect many areas of your life and health, and your doctor may be able to help you if you have insomnia or other conditions affecting your sleep.

Sleep deprivation can have both short- and long-term consequences. Learn more about the health consequences of sleep loss. If you're concerned about having trouble falling asleep or staying asleep, assess your risk for a sleep disorder.

It's not surprising you feel that you're not functioning at your best today. Some people say they can function on four to six hours of sleep each night, but research shows that adults who get fewer than seven hours of sleep — whether for just one night or over the course of days, weeks, or months — have more difficulty concentrating and more mood problems than people who sleep seven to nine hours.

Since you usually get too little sleep, please talk to your doctor about your sleep patterns. Poor quality sleep can affect many areas of your life and health, and your doctor may be able to help you if you have difficulty sleeping, have insomnia, or have other sleep disorders.

Learn more about the health consequences of sleep loss. If you're concerned about having trouble falling asleep or staying asleep, assess your risk for a sleep disorder.

It's not surprising you feel that you're not functioning at your best today. Some people say they can function on four to six hours of sleep each night, but research shows that adults who get fewer than seven hours of sleep — whether for just one night or over the course of days, weeks, or months — have more difficulty concentrating and more mood problems than people who sleep seven to nine hours.

It's good that you usually do get more sleep, since sleep deprivation can have both short- and long-term consequences. Learn more about the health consequences of sleep loss. And if you're concerned about having trouble falling asleep or staying asleep, assess your risk for a sleep disorder.

You say you are able to function well with fewer than seven hours of sleep. Some people say they can function on four to six hours of sleep each night, but research shows that adults who get fewer than seven hours of sleep — whether for just one night or over the course of days, weeks, or months — have more difficulty concentrating and more mood problems than people who sleep seven to nine hours.

It's good that you usually do get more sleep because sleep deprivation can have both short- and long-term consequences. Learn more about the health consequences of sleep loss. And if you're concerned about having trouble falling asleep or staying asleep, assess your risk for a sleep disorder.

It's not surprising you feel that you're not functioning at your best today. Some people say they can function on four to six hours of sleep each night, but research shows that adults who get fewer than seven hours of sleep — whether for just one night or over the course of days, weeks, or months — have more difficulty concentrating and more mood problems than people who sleep seven to nine hours.

Since you usually get less sleep, please talk to your doctor about your sleep patterns. Poor quality sleep can affect many areas of your life and health, and your doctor may be able to help you if you have difficulty sleeping or have insomnia or other sleep disorders.

Learn more about the health consequences of sleep loss. If you're concerned about having trouble falling asleep or staying asleep, assess your risk for a sleep disorder.

It's wonderful that you got a good night's sleep last night. Many people struggle to do so. Having a good sleep routine often is the key to getting the quality sleep night after night that your body needs for optimal health. Whether your sleep routine involves taking a warm bath, reading a book, or meditating, it's important to keep your bedtime and routine consistent every night and wake up around the same time every morning.

Click here to read more about the importance of sleep. If you're concerned about having trouble falling asleep, staying asleep, or sleeping too much, assess your risk for a sleep disorder.

It's unfortunate you're not functioning at your best today. You say you had a good quantity of sleep last night, but maybe the quality of your sleep is not as good as it could be? Having a good sleep routine — including a consistent bedtime and wake time — often is the key to getting the quality sleep night after night that your body needs for optimal health. Since you usually sleep this amount, if you often aren't feeling your best, you should consider talking to your doctor. Could you have an underlying condition? Are you feeling anxious or depressed? Have you taken medication that disrupted your sleep? Do you or could you have sleep apnea? Or do you naturally require a little bit more sleep?

Although sleep is crucial for optimal health, some research suggests that sleeping too much can also have negative consequences. Learn more about sleep. If you're concerned about having trouble falling asleep, staying asleep, or sleeping too much, assess your risk for a sleep disorder.

It's unfortunate you're not functioning at your best today. You say you had a good quantity of sleep last night, but maybe the quality of your sleep is not as good as it could be? Having a good sleep routine — including a consistent bedtime and wake time — often is the key to getting the quality sleep night after night that your body needs for optimal health. Since you usually sleep longer, if you often aren't feeling your best, you should consider talking to your doctor. Could you have an underlying condition? Are you feeling anxious or depressed? Have you taken medication that disrupted your sleep? Do you or could you have sleep apnea? Or do you naturally require a little bit more sleep?

Although sleep is crucial for optimal health, some research suggests that sleeping too much can also have negative consequences. Learn more about sleep. If you're concerned about having trouble falling asleep, staying asleep, or sleeping too much, assess your risk for a sleep disorder.

It's wonderful that you got a good night's sleep last night. Many people struggle to do so. Having a good sleep routine often is the key to getting the quality sleep night after night that your body needs for optimal health. Whether your sleep routine involves taking a warm bath, reading a book, or meditating, it's also important to keep bedtime consistent and wake up around the same time every morning.

Although sleep is crucial for optimal health, some research suggests that sleeping too much can have negative consequences. Learn more about sleep. If you're concerned about having trouble falling asleep, staying asleep, or sleeping too much, assess your risk for a sleep disorder.

It's unfortunate you're not functioning at your best today. You say you had a good quantity of sleep last night, but maybe the quality of your sleep is not as good as it could be? Having a good sleep routine — including a consistent bedtime and waking up at the same time — often is the key to getting the quality sleep night after night that your body needs for optimal health.

Since you usually get less sleep, please talk to your doctor about your sleep patterns. Poor quality sleep can affect many areas of your life and health, and your doctor may be able to help you if you have insomnia, another sleep disorder, or conditions affecting your sleep.

Learn more about the health consequences of sleep loss. If you're concerned about having trouble falling asleep or staying asleep, assess your risk for a sleep disorder.

It's wonderful that you got a good night's sleep last night. Many people struggle to do so. Having a good sleep routine often is the key to getting the quality sleep night after night that your body needs for optimal health.

Since you usually get less sleep, talk to your doctor about your sleep patterns. Poor quality sleep can affect many areas of your life and health, and your doctor may be able to help you if you have insomnia or another sleep disorder or conditions affecting your sleep.

Learn more about the health consequences of sleep loss. If you're concerned about having trouble falling asleep or staying asleep, assess your risk for a sleep disorder.

SOURCES:

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). Effect of short sleep duration on daily activities--United States, 2005-2008. MMWR Morb Mortal Wkly Rep 2011; 60:239.

Carskadon, MA, Dement, WC. Normal Human Sleep: An Overview. In: Principles and Practices of Sleep Medicine, Fifth, Kryger, MH, Roth, et al. (Eds), Elsevier Saunders, St. Louis, MO 2011. p.16.

Harvard University: "Sleep, Performance, and Public Safety."

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