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Sleep Disorders Health Center

News Related to Sleep Disorders

  1. Sleep Disruptions May Arise With Age

    Feb. 1, 2008 -- As people age, their breathing during sleep may become more irregular, a new study shows. That news comes from a study of 163 healthy, non-obese adults who spent a night at a sleep lab, with their every breath monitored as they slept. The researchers tracked the number of times each

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  2. Ambien CR May Cut Insomnia for 6 Months

    Jan. 4, 2008 -- The sleep drug Ambien CR may ease chronic insomnia when taken for six months, even when it's not taken every night. Researchers report that news in the journal Sleep -- and their findings now appear on Ambien CR's label. Duke University's Andrew Krystal, MD, and colleagues studied 1,

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  3. Anxiety Brings Long-Term Sleep Trouble

    Nov. 1, 2007 -- Stress and anxiety may lead to more than just a night or two of trouble sleeping. A new study shows anxiety can cause a long-term sleep issue. It's no surprise that major life stresses, such as death, illness, divorce, or money problems can cause trouble sleeping. But researchers fou

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  4. Stay-Awake Drug Provigil: New Warnings

    Oct. 24, 2007 -- Provigil, a prescription stay-awake drug, is getting new warnings about the risk of life-threatening rash, other serious hypersensitivity reactions, and psychiatric symptoms. Provigil is used to promote wakefulness in adults with conditions involving excessive sleepiness, including

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  5. Sleep Deprivation Stirs Up Emotions

    Oct. 22, 2007 -- Sleep deprivation may make it harder to keep your emotions in check. A new study shows that sleep deprivation is linked to a disconnect in the part of the brain responsible for keeping emotions under control, adding to the already long list of negative effects of lack of sleep on he

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  6. You May Sleep Less Than You Think

    Oct. 15, 2007 -- You may be sleeping for an hour less than you think. That's according to a new sleep study of 2,113 adults aged 40 and older (average age: 67). They reported sleeping for an average of seven hours on a typical night. But they actually slept for only six hours when they spent a night

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  7. Sleep Apnea Device May Help Save Heart

    Aug. 29, 2007 -- A device that treats a common sleep disorder called obstructive sleep apnea may help prevent heart attacks, strokes, and other cardiovascular problems, a new study shows. Obstructive sleep apnea is a very serious condition in which people have trouble breathing during sleep because

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  8. Less Sleep, More Bathroom Trips

    Aug. 8, 2007 -- Lying awake at night increases urine production -- meaning more trips to the bathroom, especially for men, Danish researchers find. At night, urine production slows -- one of evolution's contributions to a good night's sleep. But what happens if you can't get to sleep? To find out, B

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  9. Restless Legs Syndrome: New Gene Clues

    July 18, 2007 -- Two new studies identify the first gene variants associated with restless legs syndrome. The studies appear in today's online editions of The New England Journal of Medicine and Nature Genetics. Together, the studies pinpoint three common genetic variations that are linked to restle

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  10. Comfortable Way to Treat Sleep Apnea

    July 16, 2007 -- An experimental treatment may offer a more comfortable alternative to cumbersome treatments for obstructive sleep apnea. The treatment entails using a thin, flexible tube with small prongs that are inserted into the nostrils. A new, small study shows the treatment effectively reduce

    Read Full Article
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You say you are able to function well with fewer than seven hours of sleep. Some people say they can function on four to six hours of sleep each night, but research shows that adults who get fewer than seven hours of sleep — whether for just one night or over the course of days, weeks, or months — have more difficulty concentrating and more mood problems than people who sleep seven to nine hours.

Since you usually get too little sleep, please talk to your doctor about your sleep patterns. Poor quality sleep can affect many areas of your life and health, and your doctor may be able to help you if you have insomnia or other conditions affecting your sleep.

Sleep deprivation can have both short- and long-term consequences. Learn more about the health consequences of sleep loss. If you're concerned about having trouble falling asleep or staying asleep, assess your risk for a sleep disorder.

It's not surprising you feel that you're not functioning at your best today. Some people say they can function on four to six hours of sleep each night, but research shows that adults who get fewer than seven hours of sleep — whether for just one night or over the course of days, weeks, or months — have more difficulty concentrating and more mood problems than people who sleep seven to nine hours.

Since you usually get too little sleep, please talk to your doctor about your sleep patterns. Poor quality sleep can affect many areas of your life and health, and your doctor may be able to help you if you have difficulty sleeping, have insomnia, or have other sleep disorders.

Learn more about the health consequences of sleep loss. If you're concerned about having trouble falling asleep or staying asleep, assess your risk for a sleep disorder.

It's not surprising you feel that you're not functioning at your best today. Some people say they can function on four to six hours of sleep each night, but research shows that adults who get fewer than seven hours of sleep — whether for just one night or over the course of days, weeks, or months — have more difficulty concentrating and more mood problems than people who sleep seven to nine hours.

It's good that you usually do get more sleep, since sleep deprivation can have both short- and long-term consequences. Learn more about the health consequences of sleep loss. And if you're concerned about having trouble falling asleep or staying asleep, assess your risk for a sleep disorder.

You say you are able to function well with fewer than seven hours of sleep. Some people say they can function on four to six hours of sleep each night, but research shows that adults who get fewer than seven hours of sleep — whether for just one night or over the course of days, weeks, or months — have more difficulty concentrating and more mood problems than people who sleep seven to nine hours.

It's good that you usually do get more sleep because sleep deprivation can have both short- and long-term consequences. Learn more about the health consequences of sleep loss. And if you're concerned about having trouble falling asleep or staying asleep, assess your risk for a sleep disorder.

It's not surprising you feel that you're not functioning at your best today. Some people say they can function on four to six hours of sleep each night, but research shows that adults who get fewer than seven hours of sleep — whether for just one night or over the course of days, weeks, or months — have more difficulty concentrating and more mood problems than people who sleep seven to nine hours.

Since you usually get less sleep, please talk to your doctor about your sleep patterns. Poor quality sleep can affect many areas of your life and health, and your doctor may be able to help you if you have difficulty sleeping or have insomnia or other sleep disorders.

Learn more about the health consequences of sleep loss. If you're concerned about having trouble falling asleep or staying asleep, assess your risk for a sleep disorder.

It's wonderful that you got a good night's sleep last night. Many people struggle to do so. Having a good sleep routine often is the key to getting the quality sleep night after night that your body needs for optimal health. Whether your sleep routine involves taking a warm bath, reading a book, or meditating, it's important to keep your bedtime and routine consistent every night and wake up around the same time every morning.

Click here to read more about the importance of sleep. If you're concerned about having trouble falling asleep, staying asleep, or sleeping too much, assess your risk for a sleep disorder.

It's unfortunate you're not functioning at your best today. You say you had a good quantity of sleep last night, but maybe the quality of your sleep is not as good as it could be? Having a good sleep routine — including a consistent bedtime and wake time — often is the key to getting the quality sleep night after night that your body needs for optimal health. Since you usually sleep this amount, if you often aren't feeling your best, you should consider talking to your doctor. Could you have an underlying condition? Are you feeling anxious or depressed? Have you taken medication that disrupted your sleep? Do you or could you have sleep apnea? Or do you naturally require a little bit more sleep?

Although sleep is crucial for optimal health, some research suggests that sleeping too much can also have negative consequences. Learn more about sleep. If you're concerned about having trouble falling asleep, staying asleep, or sleeping too much, assess your risk for a sleep disorder.

It's unfortunate you're not functioning at your best today. You say you had a good quantity of sleep last night, but maybe the quality of your sleep is not as good as it could be? Having a good sleep routine — including a consistent bedtime and wake time — often is the key to getting the quality sleep night after night that your body needs for optimal health. Since you usually sleep longer, if you often aren't feeling your best, you should consider talking to your doctor. Could you have an underlying condition? Are you feeling anxious or depressed? Have you taken medication that disrupted your sleep? Do you or could you have sleep apnea? Or do you naturally require a little bit more sleep?

Although sleep is crucial for optimal health, some research suggests that sleeping too much can also have negative consequences. Learn more about sleep. If you're concerned about having trouble falling asleep, staying asleep, or sleeping too much, assess your risk for a sleep disorder.

It's wonderful that you got a good night's sleep last night. Many people struggle to do so. Having a good sleep routine often is the key to getting the quality sleep night after night that your body needs for optimal health. Whether your sleep routine involves taking a warm bath, reading a book, or meditating, it's also important to keep bedtime consistent and wake up around the same time every morning.

Although sleep is crucial for optimal health, some research suggests that sleeping too much can have negative consequences. Learn more about sleep. If you're concerned about having trouble falling asleep, staying asleep, or sleeping too much, assess your risk for a sleep disorder.

It's unfortunate you're not functioning at your best today. You say you had a good quantity of sleep last night, but maybe the quality of your sleep is not as good as it could be? Having a good sleep routine — including a consistent bedtime and waking up at the same time — often is the key to getting the quality sleep night after night that your body needs for optimal health.

Since you usually get less sleep, please talk to your doctor about your sleep patterns. Poor quality sleep can affect many areas of your life and health, and your doctor may be able to help you if you have insomnia, another sleep disorder, or conditions affecting your sleep.

Learn more about the health consequences of sleep loss. If you're concerned about having trouble falling asleep or staying asleep, assess your risk for a sleep disorder.

It's wonderful that you got a good night's sleep last night. Many people struggle to do so. Having a good sleep routine often is the key to getting the quality sleep night after night that your body needs for optimal health.

Since you usually get less sleep, talk to your doctor about your sleep patterns. Poor quality sleep can affect many areas of your life and health, and your doctor may be able to help you if you have insomnia or another sleep disorder or conditions affecting your sleep.

Learn more about the health consequences of sleep loss. If you're concerned about having trouble falling asleep or staying asleep, assess your risk for a sleep disorder.

SOURCES:

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). Effect of short sleep duration on daily activities--United States, 2005-2008. MMWR Morb Mortal Wkly Rep 2011; 60:239.

Carskadon, MA, Dement, WC. Normal Human Sleep: An Overview. In: Principles and Practices of Sleep Medicine, Fifth, Kryger, MH, Roth, et al. (Eds), Elsevier Saunders, St. Louis, MO 2011. p.16.

Harvard University: "Sleep, Performance, and Public Safety."

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